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if ((typed_edge!='Either') || (typed_edge!='Walkable')){
    alert("YES");
    alert("type_edge"+ typed_edge + bus_stops_visited[$k]+ " " +bus_stops_visited[$k+1]);
    }

if typed_edge has value Either, The alert("YES") is displayed.

Isn't is supposed not to be displayed? I'm stucked please help

what i want is that when typed_edge has value "Either" or "Walkable", the alerts are not displayed. But this seems not to be the case!

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3  
It guaranteed to be invoked in that example, because typed_edge is always going to be different from one of those strings, because it cannot match both strings. –  Jim Blackler Feb 26 '12 at 22:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The way you have it above you need this:

if('Either' !== typed_edge && 'Walkable' !== typed_edge) {
 // this means - it is NOT both of them
}

The way you have it right now, it says:

IF it's not Either

or

If it's not Walkable

Which means if it is 'Walkable', then the first condition evaluates to 'true'

That means the alert will fire.

Conversely, if it's 'Either', then the second condition will be 'true', and it will fire.

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+1 @jens.bhurtah: A more literal translation of your description is !(.. == .. || .. == ..), which might be more understandable. –  pimvdb Feb 26 '12 at 22:16
    
+1. You're the only one (so far) who seems to have understood the intent of the question (except MattP, but he's deleted his answer). –  nnnnnn Feb 26 '12 at 22:35
    
I need to answer another question soon - can't stay on 666 too long... I think the poster wasn't so sure about the syntax, but looked like the rest was understood. –  MyStream Feb 26 '12 at 22:38
if (typed_edge==='Either' || typed_edge==='Walkable'){
    alert("YES");
    alert("type_edge"+ typed_edge + bus_stops_visited[$k]+ " " +bus_stops_visited[$k+1]);
}

you should make a condition a sentence so that it's easier to build. that way, you just replace the grammar with the syntax needed.

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Try this:

if (typed_edge !== 'Either' && typed_edge !== 'Walkable'){
    alert("YES");
    alert("type_edge"+ typed_edge + bus_stops_visited[$k]+ " " +bus_stops_visited[$k+1]);
}

Edit: missed that "not" in the question

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That does the opposite of what @jens.bhurtah asked for: he wants the alerts to be not displayed if matches either of those strings. –  Dave Feb 26 '12 at 22:23
    
This is now the same as the code in the question (except using !== instead of !=), and thus doesn't achieve the desired result. –  nnnnnn Feb 26 '12 at 23:39
    
Sorry.. I've posted code without testing it. Now it makes sense - if text is NOT either and text is NOT walkable –  Adaz Feb 26 '12 at 23:49

The || conditional if being used correctly, however you are using the not-equal-to within the if() statement, try this:

if ((typed_edge=='Either') || (typed_edge=='Walkable')){
    alert("YES");
    alert("type_edge"+ typed_edge + bus_stops_visited[$k]+ " " +bus_stops_visited[$k+1]);
}
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Perhaps try another approach. Load your whitelisted/blacklisted values in an array, and check whether any are found.

if(["Either","Walkable"].indexOf(typed_edge) > -1)
{
    alert('got either or walkable here');
}
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