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I have an existing Django app (D) that I would like to connect with a PHP app (P, on a different server) for authentication. That is, users log into D, which calls a service on P to check their password. They will also need to end up with a local user account, storing properties about them in D. Actual security requirements are very low. It's very difficult for D to access P's database directly.

Never having implemented any authentication, I was thinking of something like this:

  1. D: Collect username and password, compute hash (using same algorithm as P)
  2. D: Call web service (HTTP) on P, passing username and hash
  3. P: Look up username, fail if it doesn't exist.
  4. P: If it does, check stored hash against passed hash, fail if different.
  5. P: If ok, return some other information about the user (eg, full name, some domain-specific stuff), otherwise return fail
  6. D: If ok, create/update the user record
  7. D: If ok, then log them in.

So, a few questions:

  • Is this approach sensible? What attacks is it vulnerable to (to inform the client...)?
  • What do you call the functionality being added at P: an authentication provider?
  • Is there a more standard way of doing this stuff, using standard protocols, or at the least, web service call names?
  • Is step 6 a reasonable approach? Is there a downside to synchronising user databases this way?
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Is the server hosting the Django app in the same local network as the PHP app or are you authenticating over the internet? –  Victor Neo Feb 27 '12 at 3:07
    
Same local network (within the same institution, anyway). –  Steve Bennett Feb 27 '12 at 4:15

1 Answer 1

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Since you have mentioned that both servers are in the same institution / network, the authentication can work provided that you use HTTPS instead of plain HTTP.

D: Collect username and password, compute hash (using same algorithm as P)

Unless you can ascertain that the PHP hashes are the same as your Django hashes, I recommend that you send the password over (but not over plain HTTP, see point 2).

Call web service (HTTP) on P, passing username and hash

You should only use plain HTTP if you are absolutely sure that the two servers are directly connected. Otherwise you are susceptible to typical web attacks (eg. Man-in-the-middle) where you transmit the (hashed) password in clear. I am assuming that on the PHP app side, you are directly verifying that the hash is the same. If unsure of the network conditions, ensure that you are calling the web service over HTTPS.

P: Look up username, fail if it doesn't exist.
P: If it does, check stored hash against passed hash, fail if different.
P: If ok, return some other information about the user (eg, full name, some domain-specific stuff), otherwise return fail
D: If ok, create/update the user record
D: If ok, then log them in.

These steps are fine, but if you are looking for constant user synchronization between the two databases, you need to find a way to update your own user database. If the PHP app disables / deletes a user, the Django app needs to pick up that change or you will still allow the deleted user to login on the Django side.

There are two ways to solve this problem:

  1. Poll every X minutes / hours to verify that the user status are the same
  2. Use a messaging system (eg. RabbitMQ) so that every change on the PHP side will be published and received on the Django side.

The first way is simpler but not as efficient and secure, since the user can still login on the Django side before the next poll. This is recommended if security is not vital and that there is only a small number of users.

The second way is better but you will have to write more code to manage the synchronization (PHP and Django). This way is much better as you can keep track of user changes in the PHP app almost immediately and reflect it in your own database, you can ignore changes to the users in the PHP side if the user is not using your Django app (hence no records on your side).

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