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I have the the following classes:

class Base
{
public:
    Base() { x = 3; }
    int x;
    virtual void foo() {};
};

class Med1 : public virtual Base
{
public:
    int x;
    Med1() { x = 4; }
    virtual void foo() {};
};

class Med2 : public virtual Base
{
public:
    virtual void goo() {};
    virtual void foo() {};
};

class Der : public Med1, public Med2
{
public:
    Der() {}
    virtual void foo() {};
    virtual void goo() {};
};

And the following code:

Base* d = new Der;
d->foo();
cout << d->x;

Output:

 3

Why is that? Med1 constructor is called after Base constructor. I'm guessing it's setting Med1::x, and not Base::x, but why is Der::x the same as Base::x and not Med1::x. Why is there no ambiguity?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

d is a pointer to Base, so d->x refers unambiguously to Base::x. There would only be an ambiguity if it were a pointer to Der.

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Ha! Makes sense, don't know why I missed that. But I changed the code and still no ambiguity. It prints 4 if I have a pointer to Der. Guess Med1 hides Base::x. –  Luchian Grigore Feb 26 '12 at 22:56

Since it is pointer to Base x will be of Base. And the order of constructor is super class and then derived class. So constructor of Base class is called first and then of Der.

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The first part of the answer is identical to Mike's. The second part I already stated in the question... –  Luchian Grigore Feb 26 '12 at 23:20

The variable x is not virtual, so the compiler has to scratch its head and say - hang on you Base. Therefore it goes to Base->x

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Of course in C++ a data member cannot be virtual. (I guess the downvote was about the fact that this answer implied that a variable could be virtual...) The point is that Med1::x does not override Base::x, because only a virtual function declaration can override other virtual function declarations. –  curiousguy Aug 4 '12 at 16:53

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