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I have a database app I'm working on for car products.

I want the returned products results to match the conditions of:

  • The 'MAKE' MUST match
  • The 'CATEGORY' MUST match
  • But when it gets to the 'OPTIONS', It can be either or all. I want it to return products that have either one or all of the options selected

I am using:

SELECT *
FROM `PRODUCTS`
WHERE `MAKE` LIKE '%CHEV%'
AND `CATEGORY` LIKE '%BUMPERS%'
AND `OPTIONS` LIKE '%TOW HOOKS%'
OR `OPTIONS` LIKE '%LIGHT MOUNT HOLES%'

When I use this it works but it is producing results from different MAKES as well. So it is returning products from lets say FORD as well... I don't want that.

I want the MAKE and CATEGORY to be strict (they must match) but the OPTIONS can be one or both - or maybe even three or four different options - but at least one option must match.

The OPTIONS filed is a string separated by pipe characters i.e. LIGHT MOUNT HOLES|TOW HOOKS|FOUR DOOR, and I don't want to change this.

If I use the above query with just one OPTION in the search:

 AND `OPTIONS` LIKE '%TOW HOOKS%'" or just "AND `OPTIONS` LIKE '%LIGHT MOUNT HOLES%'

... it works perfectly. However, if I try to search for multiple OPTIONS, it starts bringing back products from different MAKES.

I have also tried:

SELECT *
FROM `PRODUCTS`
WHERE `MAKE` LIKE '%CHEV%'
AND `CATEGORY` LIKE '%BUMPERS%'
OR `OPTIONS` LIKE '%TOW HOOKS%'
OR `OPTIONS` LIKE '%LIGHT MOUNT HOLES%'

And have the same problem of multiple MAKES showing up.

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
SELECT *
FROM `PRODUCTS`
WHERE `MAKE` LIKE '%CHEV%'
AND `CATEGORY` LIKE '%BUMPERS%'
AND (`OPTIONS` LIKE '%TOW HOOKS%'
    OR `OPTIONS` LIKE '%LIGHT MOUNT HOLES%'
    OR ...)

This will match at least one option.

If you also want to return cars with NO options matched use:

SELECT *
FROM `PRODUCTS`
WHERE `MAKE` LIKE '%CHEV%'
AND `CATEGORY` LIKE '%BUMPERS%'

Edit

Explanation: the difference between this and what you have is that all the LIKE clauses are grouped together. Which means that they are in essence just one condition next to the make and the category. the thing you need to get your head around is that logical AND/OR are not the same as we use them in English. In your query if a car had options like '%LIGHT MOUNT HOLES%' then the condition is met.

Let M (make), C (category), O1 (option1), O2 (option2) denote the 4 clauses you have in your query, and R be the result of evaluating them. Then R = M AND C AND O1 OR O2. if O2 is true, then M, C and O1 are irrelevant. becuase by definition X = A OR B is true if either A or B is true. what you want is R = M AND C AND (O1 OR O2 OR ...). this way R is true only if all of M, C and at least one of the Os is true.

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Thanks all you brainiacs for your replies. May I ask for the explanation of this? Is it Like the poster "Kolink" is saying regarding the Math Order of Operations? –  user1005858 Feb 27 '12 at 3:59
    
@user1005858, see edit. –  Is7aq Feb 27 '12 at 4:07
    
@user1005858, just updated the 2nd query, if you want to relax the options match just get rid of it all together. –  Is7aq Feb 27 '12 at 4:12
    
Right and thank you - but your example of: "(OPTIONS LIKE '%' OR OPTIONS LIKE '%BUMPERS%' OR OPTIONS LIKE '%TOW HOOKS%')" Shows how you can include empty options fields as well as specific options - doesn't it? –  user1005858 Feb 27 '12 at 6:04
    
@user1005858, Yes, but I reviewed it and realized that there is no point leaving ``OPTIONS` LIKE '%'` clause when it is going to evaluate to true regardless. –  Is7aq Feb 27 '12 at 12:31
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What you are doing is comparable to having:

3 * 4 + 5

and expecting 27. But because of the order of precedence of operators, the answer is 17.

You can "fix" this and get 27 like so:

3 * (4 + 5)

The exact same applies to many programming languages, and MySQL is no exception.

Put your OR options in parentheses so they get treated as a group.

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Thank you for this - as this is also correct - the example above - was in MYSQL - and I thought that other readers would get more out of that. Although your answer was correct as well. –  user1005858 Feb 27 '12 at 6:08
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My educated guess would be that it is the fault of the OR, because it evaluates like (this AND that AND that AND that) OR something. You could confirm that by checking if all returning different makes contain the criteria from the OR.

As for solving it: You can use brackets: this AND that AND (that OR something_else).

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Thank you very much as well –  user1005858 Feb 27 '12 at 6:33
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