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What's the right way to do...

var array1 = []
var array2 = []

function doIt(arg){
    var myArray;

    if(arg == 1){
        myArray = array1
    }else if(arg == 2){
        myArray = array2
    }

    myArray.push('test');

}

doIt(1); //array1 should now be ['test'] but it's empty
share|improve this question
    
What exactly do you mean by "it's empty"? You are missing some semi-colons, btw. –  bernie Feb 27 '12 at 0:21
    
@AdamBernier: Doesn't JavaScript insert helpful automatic semicolons to make the programmer's life easier? Also, I assume that by "empty" the OP means that array1 contains no elements (which is because myArray = array makes a copy of the array). –  Kerrek SB Feb 27 '12 at 0:23
    
@Kerrek SB: you're probably right; some development environments likely auto-insert semi-colons. Regarding your second point: arrays are objects and are passed by reference. –  bernie Feb 27 '12 at 0:27
1  
Javascript does not pass by reference. Like Java, objects are hidden behind references, and they are passed by value –  newacct Feb 27 '12 at 0:44
1  
@ofko - I see nothing wrong with the code in the question except that you'd get an error if you called your function with a value other than 1 or 2 (in which case it would try to do undefined.push()). But for a value of 1 it should work as you expect. Is there any other code not shown that could affect it? –  nnnnnn Feb 27 '12 at 0:56

3 Answers 3

Aside from four minor syntactic blemishes, your code is OK: http://jsfiddle.net/hk9Md/

var array1 = []; // <-- added semi-colon
var array2 = []; // <-- added semi-colon

function doIt(arg){
    var myArray;

    if (arg == 1) {
        myArray = array1; // <-- added semi-colon
    } else if (arg == 2) {
        myArray = array2; // <-- added semi-colon
    }
    myArray.push('test');
}
doIt(1);
alert(array1[0]); // produces 'test' 
share|improve this answer
1  
Those "missing" semicolons are all optional. I prefer to include them as a matter of style, but this particular code will work exactly the same with or without them. (I acknowledge that there are cases where inclusion of a semicolon matters, but this is not such a case.) –  nnnnnn Feb 27 '12 at 0:51
    
@nnnnnn: that's interesting behavior, thanks. And thanks to Kerrek SB for mentioning the same in other comments. –  bernie Feb 27 '12 at 1:18
1  
I found out that my code was passing the wrong value for arg and that was the problem. I hope this will be helpful for someone anyway. –  ofko Feb 27 '12 at 2:11
    
wait, no that's not it. :O ...I got some debugging to do –  ofko Feb 27 '12 at 2:24

Why not:

var myArray = arg == 1? array1 : array2;

If there are more than two choices, you might try:

var source = {
  '1': array1,
  '2': array2,
  '3': array3,
  ...
}

or zero–indexed:

var source = [ ,array1, array2, array3, ...];

then:

function doIt(arg) {
  var myArray = source[arg];
  ...
}  

or even:

var doIt = (function() {
  var source = {
    '1': array1,
    '2': array2,
    '3': array3,
    ...
  }
  return function (arg) {
    var myArray = source[arg];
  }
}());

Fill yer boots. :-)

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OK, they're all other ways of implementing what is in the question, but why doesn't the original code work as is? –  nnnnnn Feb 27 '12 at 0:58

Arguably, the "right" way to do this is not to write functions with side effects. You could write the function so that it returns a modified copy of the array:

var array1 = [1, 2, 3],
    array2 = [4, 5, 6],
    x = getUserInput(),
    result = doIt(1, x == 1 ? array1 : array2);

function doIt(arg, original_array){
  var copy = [].concat(original_array);
  // ...
  return copy;
}

Sometimes it's unavoidable, but programs get much harder to debug when local functions change global state.

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