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I have two tables, 'po' and 'receive'

CREATE TABLE `po` (
  `PO_ID` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
  `SERVICE_TYPE` bit(1) DEFAULT NULL,
  `ENTRY_DATE` date NOT NULL,
  `RECEIPT_DATE` date DEFAULT NULL,
  `TURNOVER` date DEFAULT NULL,
  `MOBILIZATION` date DEFAULT NULL,
  `SITE_NAME` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `SITE_CODE` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `SITE_TIN` varchar(45) DEFAULT NULL,
  `SITE_ADDRESS` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `COST` decimal(11,2) NOT NULL,
  `XML` text,
  PRIMARY KEY (`PO_ID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8$$

CREATE TABLE `receive` (
  `RECEIPT_ID` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  `RECEIPT_DATE` date NOT NULL,
  `PO_NUMBER` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
  `SUPPLIER_ID` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`RECEIPT_ID`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8$$

I'm trying to connect two tables by defining a foreign key 'fk_po' on the table 'receive'

ALTER TABLE `fourthwave`.`receive` 
  ADD CONSTRAINT `fk_po`
  FOREIGN KEY (`PO_NUMBER` )
  REFERENCES `fourthwave`.`po` (`PO_ID` )
  ON DELETE SET NULL
  ON UPDATE SET NULL
, ADD INDEX `fk_po` (`PO_NUMBER` ASC)

However, the alter query above throws an error :

Error Code: 1005. Can't create table 'fourthwave.#sql-aec_11' (errno:150)

Am i getting this error because the field's names, 'PO_ID' and 'PO_NUMBER' on both tables are different?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Execute SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS statement after ALTER TABLE, and you will see the error message - 'You have defined a SET NULL condition though some of the columns are defined as NOT NULL'.

ALTER TABLE `receive` 
  ADD CONSTRAINT `fk_po`
  FOREIGN KEY (`PO_NUMBER` )
  REFERENCES `po` (`PO_ID` )
  ON DELETE SET NULL
  ON UPDATE SET NULL
 , ADD INDEX `fk_po` (`PO_NUMBER` ASC);

SHOW ENGINE INNODB STATUS;
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This worked? You can have an index and FK constraint with the same name? –  Mike Purcell Feb 27 '12 at 17:35
    
Yes, it works. You can give another name, but if you do not create this index, MySQL will create it itself - with the same name. –  Devart Feb 27 '12 at 17:53
    
Interesting. When I add a FK and leave out the name of the constraint, MySQL always populates with something like some_table_ibfk_1 automagically, which I assumed was meant to ensure there were no name collisions with respect to indices and FKs. –  Mike Purcell Feb 27 '12 at 17:57
    
The bit about showing INNODB error messages was very helpful! –  Raj Apr 1 '13 at 2:06

You need an index on PO_NUMBER in the receive table. The field you are referencing in a foreign key always should be indexed.

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