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I have a custom HandleError attribute that deals with errors on the MVC pipeline; I have an protected void Application_Error(object sender, EventArgs e) method on my Global.asax which handles errors from outside the pipeline.

I've come across an scenario I didn't know was possible; In implementing DI, there's a dependency for a connectionString, which is taken from the application configuration file.

As the connection string didn't exist yet, an error raises when creating the controller, this usually makes the Application_Error handler fire, and a proper error page is rendered (through rendering a partial view as string and sending it as the response, and in case this fails it just writes "Fatal exception." to the response.

Except in this case, I get the fugly default ASP.NET "runtime error" yellow screen of death. Telling me:

Runtime Error

Description: An application error occurred on the server. The current custom error settings for this application prevent the details of the application error from being viewed.

Details: To enable the details of this specific error message to be viewable on the local server machine, please create a tag within a "web.config" configuration file located in the root directory of the current web application. This tag should then have its "mode" attribute set to "RemoteOnly". To enable the details to be viewable on remote machines, please set "mode" to "Off".

I don't have a defaultRedirect set in my customErrors, nor is it turned Off, because I don't want to redirect but to render errors on the same page the user is in, avoiding a needless redirect.

How can I handle an scenario such as this? And what's even the reason why it behaves this way and not like any other error outside a controller?

I realize it's not likely to happen often, but I would like being able to stop the YSOD (partly because I want to hide the technology I'm using, but mostly because it's not pretty nor user friendly at all)

I even tried registering a handler for UnhandledExceptions, but it didn't fire either.

AppDomain.CurrentDomain.UnhandledException += CurrentDomain_UnhandledException;

The code that ultimately produces this, is:

return ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings[key].ConnectionString;, where ConnectionStrings[key] is null.

Update

This is how applicaion errors are handled:

    protected void Application_Error(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        this.HandleApplicationError(new ResourceController());
    }

    public static void HandleApplicationError(this HttpApplication application, BaseController controller)
    {
        if (application == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("application");
        }
        if (controller == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("controller");
        }
        application.Response.Clear();
        Exception exception = application.Server.GetLastError();
        LogApplicationException(application.Response, exception);
        try
        {
            RenderExceptionViewResponse(application, exception, controller);
        }
        catch (Exception exceptionRenderingView) // now we're in trouble. let's be as graceful as possible.
        {
            RenderExceptionTextResponse(application, exceptionRenderingView);
        }
        finally
        {
            application.Server.ClearError();
        }
    }

    private static void LogApplicationException(HttpResponse response, Exception exception)
    {
        if (exception is HttpException)
        {
            HttpException httpException = (HttpException)exception;
            if (httpException.GetHttpCode() == (int)HttpStatusCode.NotFound)
            {
                _log.Debug(Resources.Error.WebResourceNotFound, httpException);
                response.Status = Resources.Constants.NotFound;
                return;
            }
        }
        _log.Error(Resources.Error.UnhandledException, exception);
    }

    private static void RenderExceptionViewResponse(HttpApplication application, Exception exception, BaseController controller)
    {
        if (!RenderAsJsonResponse(application, Resources.User.UnhandledExceptionJson))
        {
            ErrorViewModel model = WebUtility.GetErrorViewModel(exception);
            string result = controller.RenderViewToString(Resources.Constants.ErrorViewName, model);
            application.Response.Write(result);
        }
    }

    private static void RenderExceptionTextResponse(HttpApplication application, Exception exceptionRenderingView)
    {
        application.Response.Clear();

        if (!RenderAsJsonResponse(application, Resources.User.FatalExceptionJson))
        {
            application.Response.Write(Resources.User.FatalException);
        }
        _log.Fatal(Resources.Error.FatalException, exceptionRenderingView);
    }

    private static bool RenderAsJsonResponse(HttpApplication application, string message)
    {
        if (application.Request.IsAjaxRequest())
        {
            application.Response.Status = Resources.Constants.HttpSuccess;
            application.Response.ContentType = Resources.Constants.JsonContentType;
            application.Response.Write(message);
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

This is the attribute I use to decorate my base controller:

public class ErrorHandlingAttribute : HandleErrorAttribute
{
    public Type LoggerType { get; set; }

    public ErrorHandlingAttribute()
        : this(typeof(ErrorHandlingAttribute))
    {
    }

    public ErrorHandlingAttribute(Type loggerType)
    {
        LoggerType = loggerType;
    }

    public override void OnException(ExceptionContext filterContext)
    {
        if (filterContext.ExceptionHandled)
        {
            return;
        }
        if (filterContext.HttpContext.Request.IsAjaxRequest())
        {
            OnAjaxException(filterContext);
        }
        else
        {
            OnRegularException(filterContext);
        }
    }

    internal protected void OnRegularException(ExceptionContext filterContext)
    {
        Exception exception = filterContext.Exception;

        ILog logger = LogManager.GetLogger(LoggerType);
        logger.Error(Resources.Error.UnhandledException, exception);

        filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Clear();

        ErrorViewModel model = WebUtility.GetErrorViewModel(exception);
        filterContext.Result = new ViewResult
        {
            ViewName = Resources.Constants.ErrorViewName,
            ViewData = new ViewDataDictionary(model)
        };
        filterContext.ExceptionHandled = true;
    }

    internal protected void OnAjaxException(ExceptionContext filterContext)
    {
        Exception exception = filterContext.Exception;

        ILog logger = LogManager.GetLogger(LoggerType);
        logger.Error(Resources.Error.UnhandledAjaxException, exception);

        filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Clear();
        filterContext.HttpContext.Response.Status = Resources.Constants.HttpSuccess;

        string errorMessage = WebUtility.GetUserExceptionMessage(exception, true);

        filterContext.Result = new ExceptionJsonResult(new[] { errorMessage });
        filterContext.ExceptionHandled = true;
    }
}

And this is my customErrors:

<customErrors mode="On" />

As you can see these are pretty extensive, however they do not even fire in the case of accessing the ConnectionStrings where the ConnectionString doesn't exist; which is kind of puzzling.

It does fire in any controller contained exception or exceptions not within a controller, so I don't understand why this case is any different.

share|improve this question

Application_Error might be the recommended way of handling errors in ASP.NET WebForms. But not in MVC.

We got error filters that take care of errors for us. The problem with the filter is that it only works when a controller has been invoked. Which is the problem for 404 and 401 errors (not found and authorization) and your database connection problem.

customErrors is the way to go here. I don't see why the redirect should be a problem?

I'm going through proper error handling in a blog article: http://blog.gauffin.org/2011/11/how-to-handle-errors-in-asp-net-mvc/

share|improve this answer
8  
Redirect for custom errors is a problem because its basically saying back to the browser (or bot) for the missing page "yes this page is OK, but please visit this other page for now", then the next page says "no I'm not OK, I don't exist". However your browser and the bot (e.g. google bot) will both store the missing page as a real page, and continue to try and index it in the case of google, because a temporary redirect says keeps checking the original page in future. Which is why it is very important to return the status 404 on the original URL requested. – Dale Burrell Aug 10 '12 at 23:14

You haven't shown how exactly are you handling the errors in your Application_Error event nor how does your custom HandleAttribute is implemented so it's hard to guess what the problem might be. A common problem to watch for when implementing Application_Error is that you render some error view which itself throws an error. Think for example an error view that depends on a Layout and inside this layout you are calling a Html.Action helper to render the contents of another action that itself does database access and stuff. Your error views should be as static as possible. Ideally you should have a different Layout for them to avoid those kind of situations.

I may also suggest you taking a look at the following approach for handling errors.

share|improve this answer
    
I updated with my error handling configuration. – bevacqua Feb 27 '12 at 16:24

To be correct to our visitors and the search engines, we should return meaningful HTTP status codes if errors occur, facing our site. It's not fair to return HTTP status code 200 on error, even if at the same time we return a view, explaining that an error occurred. if the user types in an incorrect address (the most frequent user fault), we should return HTTP status code 404 and not return or redirect to a View, where status code 200 will be returned.
There is a short and clean recommendations summary HERE.

share|improve this answer

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