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I had a quiz and I wrote this code:

Print Fizz if it is divisible by 3 and it prints Buzz if it is divisible by 5. It prints FizzBuss if it is divisible by both. Otherwise, it will print the numbers between 1 and 100.

But after I arrived home, I wondered if could have writen it with less code. However, I could not come out with a shorter code. Can I do it with a shorter code? Thanks.

This is what I wrote and I think it works well. But can I have done it with less code.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i;
    for(i=1; i<=100; i++)
    {
        if(((i%3)||(i%5))== 0)
            printf("number= %d FizzBuzz\n", i);
        else if((i%3)==0)
            printf("number= %d Fizz\n", i);
        else if((i%5)==0)
            printf("number= %d Buzz\n", i);
        else
            printf("number= %d\n",i);

    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? (BTW, did you really intend to optimize the first if statement that much? :( – Francois Feb 27 '12 at 7:37
    
stack exchange has a codegolf site I do believe – David Heffernan Feb 27 '12 at 7:44
    
This question tends to defeat those who try to be clever. You can make it shorter, but then it's easy to get it wrong. What you did is the simple way to get it right. – ugoren Feb 27 '12 at 7:44
    
No, this is not a homework problem at all. I just was trying to learn if I could have done it in shorter way. And I learned something here from the user paxdiable, where if you need to test two conditions, sometimes you could reduce these two conditions to be just one and therefore your code will be shorter. When I wrote my code I did not think in that way. Now I will use his technique from now on. – leocod Feb 27 '12 at 7:57
1  
if(((i%3)||(i%5))== 0) Don't try to be too clever, it just obscures what your code is intended to do. Also, it should print Fizz/Buzz instead of the number, so beware that some of the solutions given in the answers are wrong. – Secure Feb 27 '12 at 8:26

You could also do:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int i;
    for(i=1; i<=100; ++i)
    {
        if (i % 3 == 0)
            printf("Fizz");
        if (i % 5 == 0)
            printf("Buzz");
        if ((i % 3 != 0) && (i % 5 != 0))
            printf("number=%d", i);
        printf("\n");
    }

    return 0;
}

A few lines shorter, and a lot easier to read.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. It looks shorter. – leocod Feb 27 '12 at 7:58
    
If you always wan't the number you could also strip a line by doing printf("number=%d ", i) at the top and removing the last if. – martiert Feb 27 '12 at 8:09
    
if ((i % 3 != 0) && (i % 5 != 0)) can actually just be written as if (i % 3 && i % 5). i % 3 and i % 5 in this case will return non-zero numbers, which evaluate to true. – fbonetti Mar 10 '13 at 18:26

I'm not sure when you'd start calling it unreadable, but there's this.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
   int i = 1;
   for (; i<=100; ++i) {
      printf("number= %d %s%s\n", i, i%3?"":"Fizz", i%5?"":"Buzz");
   }
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
It runs well, and it's shorter. Thanks. – leocod Feb 27 '12 at 8:26
    
I'm pretty sure paxdiablo's solution is faster though, and not even that much longer. – Mr Lister Feb 27 '12 at 8:30
1  
Well, in all honesty, the question did ask for shorter rather than faster :-) If you declared i within the for statement and ditched the braces, it would be even shorter, without sacrificing readability. +1. – paxdiablo Feb 27 '12 at 13:28
    
@paxdiablo I could dispense with the braces, but I'm not sure about the i, since the OP didn't mention if this was C99 or not. There are no hints in the code either. – Mr Lister Feb 27 '12 at 14:10
    
It shouldn't print the number when it prints Fizz or Buzz. – Gnubie Feb 3 at 18:29

If a number is divisible by both 3 and 5, then it's divisible by 15, so:

for each number 1 to 100:
    if number % 15 == 0:
        print number, "fizzbuzz"
    else if number % 5 == 0:
        print number, "buzz"
    else if number % 3 == 0:
        print number, "fizz"
    else:
        print number

Other than that, you probably won't get it much shorter, at least in a conventional language like C (and I'm assuming you don't want the normal code-golf style modifications that make your code unreadable).

You could also get the whole thing into two lines if you packed the entire main function onto a single large line, but I would hope you wouldn't be after that sort of trickery either.

You can possibly get it faster (though you should check all performance claims for yourself) with something like:

static const char *xyzzy[] = {
    "",     "",     "fizz", "",     "buzz",
    "fizz", "",     "",     "fizz", "buzz",
    "",     "fizz", "",     "buzz", "fizzbuzz",
    // Duplicate those last three lines to have seven copies (7x15=105).
};
for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
    printf ("%d %s\n", i, xyzzy[i-1]);

As an aside, that array of char pointers is likely to be less space-expensive than you think, thanks to constant amalgamation - in other words, it will be likely that there will only be one of each C string.

As I say, whether it's faster should be tested. In addition, your original specs only called for the shortest code so it may be irrelevant.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's true. For the first test I could think of it in term of just one number. I will take that into account with future exercises. Thanks. – leocod Feb 27 '12 at 7:44

I would say that modulo is expensive while comparisons are cheap so only perform the modulo once. That would yield something like this.

int i;
for( i = 0; i!=100; ++i ) {
    bool bModThree = !(i % 3);
    bool bModFive = !(i % 5);

    if( bModThree || bModFive ) {
        if( bModThree ) {
            printf( "Fizz" );
        }
        if( bModFive ) {
            printf( "Buzz" );
        }
    } else {
        printf( "%d", i );
    }

    printf( "\n" );
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're not supposed to always print the number. – franklynd Jul 21 '15 at 17:19
    
@franklynd Oh damn. You're right. I updated the answer with a better example. – Kenneth Jul 22 '15 at 8:48

i would write something like that

    main(){
  if (i % 3 == 0){
  cout<<"Fizz";
  }
  if (i % 5 == 0){
  cout<<"Buzz";
  }
  // So if both are true, it will print “FizzBuzz” and augment the two strings
    }
share|improve this answer
    
You're not printing the number. – franklynd Jul 22 '15 at 23:09
    
This question was about C programming, not C++ programming, so this solution will not work. – smpl Dec 21 '15 at 5:55

The sample code for the above program could be as follows:

public static void printNumbers(int n) {
        for(int i = 1; i<=n; i++) {
            int flag1 = 0, flag2 = 0;
            if(i%3 == 0) {
                flag1=1;
            }
            if(i%5 == 0) {
                flag2 = 1;
            }
            if(flag1 == 1 &&  flag2 == 1) {
                System.out.println("FizzJeera");
            }
            else if(flag1 == 1 &&  flag2 == 0) {
                System.out.println("Fizz");
            }
            else if(flag1 == 0 &&  flag2 == 1) {
                System.out.println("Jeera");
            }
            else {
                System.out.println(i);
            }
        }
    }

The output of the above program when the input is 35 is as follows:

1 2 Fizz 4 Jeera Fizz 7 8 Fizz Jeera 11 Fizz 13 14 FizzJeera 16 17 Fizz 19 Jeera Fizz 22 23 Fizz Jeera 26 Fizz 28 29 FizzJeera 31 32 Fizz 34 Jeera

For the exact code, following blog can be seen.

http://javasideeffect.blogspot.in/2015/03/java-program-to-print-numbers-and.html

share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>

char const * template[] = {
  "%i",
  "Buzz",
  "Fizz",
  "FizzBuzz"
};
const int __donotuseme3[] = { 2, 0, 0 };
const int __donotuseme5[] = { 1, 0, 0, 0, 0 };
#define TEMPLATE(x) (template[__donotuseme3[(x) % 3] | __donotuseme5[(x) % 5]])

int
main(void) {
  int i;
  for (i = 1; i <= 100; i++) {
    printf(TEMPLATE(i), i);
    putchar('\n');
  }
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Obfuscated form of Mr Lister's answer

main(int i){while(i++<100){printf("number= %d %s%s",i,i%3?"":"Fizz",i%5?"":"Buzz");}}

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not obfuscated (removing line breaks is hardly obfuscation), it is wrong. – Davidmh Mar 7 '15 at 1:25

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