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Say, if I have a button that plays a sound, can I make it so that if you press it a second time it stops the music?

I use Python v.2.7, Easy Eclipse as IDE and wxFormBuilder for the windows.

Here's my code:

import gui
import wx
import wx.media
import pygame
import tkFileDialog

class MainFrame( gui.GUI_MainFrame):
    def __init__( self, parent ): #Definerar KunddatabasMainFrame
        pygame.init()
        gui.GUI_MainFrame.__init__( self, parent ) #Initierar MainFrame f�nstret
        self.sound1=pygame.mixer.Sound('beat1.wav')
        self.sound2=pygame.mixer.Sound('beat2.wav')
        self.recording = False

    def evtBrowse1(self, evt):
        tkFileDialog.askopenfilename()

    def evtSoOne(self, evt):
        self.sound1.play(loops=-1)
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1 Answer 1

I would use a global boolean variable and toggle it each time the button is pressed. The function that is called on the button press would then do different things depending on the state of this variable.

You can of course extend this to an int variable if you want to handle many more cases.

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You don't need to use a global variable - an instance variable would be sufficient in this case. –  Karl Barker Feb 27 '12 at 8:20
    
@KarlBarker No, an instance variable would be wrong in this case, as his function is manipulating global state. –  Deestan Feb 27 '12 at 8:26
    
@Deestan I admit I've not used pygame - what global state is being affected? All I see are instance variables... –  Karl Barker Feb 27 '12 at 8:35
    
Ah ya, that's implied in the stated problem - not reflected in the code snippet. Whether sounds are playing, and which ones, are state on the global mixer object. -- Calling it "wrong" was a bit too strict, though. I assumed he did not want two songs playing simultaneously, which a global variable enforces in a single threaded application. But as always, It Depends(TM) on a lot of project constraints and details. –  Deestan Feb 27 '12 at 10:23
    
Why use a global instead of an MainFrame instance variable like self.playing which is initialized in __init__()? –  martineau Feb 27 '12 at 15:38

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