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I have an set of structs that I want to store inside an anonymous member struct. Each small struct looks like this:

static struct {
    uint16_t buf[256];
} bufData[8];

I know for a fact it will only have 8 elements. I want to include this inside another struct, as such:

static struct {
    int size;
    // I am not sure how to proceed
    //char * bufData;
    //struct * bufData;
} Table[MAX_FILES];

The data is currently being entered as such:

  for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
        loadData(i,bufData[i].buf);
        printf("%s\n", bufData[i].buf); // This works
    }

and I would like to store this in the jth element of Table, like Table[j].bufData. Currently I've tried

memset(bufData, 0, sizeof(bufData));
Table[j].size = 256;
Table[j].bufData = &bufData;

and then unpackaging it, but it doesn't work.

char * test = Table[j].bufData;
for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
    printf("%s\n", test[i].buf);
}

I think I've horribly mangled this one and I need some help untangling it!

share|improve this question
1  
typedef is your friend. –  David Schwartz Feb 27 '12 at 9:53
    
how does the decl. look for bufData, is it a global variable? heap? stack? –  CyberSpock Feb 27 '12 at 10:02
    
it's a stack element that's unique for every Table[j] struct. –  Rio Feb 27 '12 at 10:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since bufData is a structure, you should store it as a bufData pointer (not a char pointer), or simply as an array of bufData:

struct BufData /* this declares a type, not a variable */
{
    uint16_t buf[256];
};

option 1:

static struct 
{
    int size;
    struct BufData* myBufData;
} Table[MAX_FILES];

option 2:

static struct 
{
    int size;
    struct BufData myBufData[8];
} Table[MAX_FILES];

edit: when declaring a struct, don't confuse declaring a type:

struct aStruct
{
...
};

with declaring a variable with an unnamed structure type:

struct 
{
...
} aVariable;

with declaring both a type and a variable wof that type:

struct aStruct
{
...
} aVariable;
share|improve this answer
    
It gives me test.c:120:22: error: 'struct <anonymous>' has no member named 'bufData' for both options (and I checked the syntax). –  Rio Feb 27 '12 at 9:58
    
So I go with declaring both type and variable and the container struct Table is complaining that tests.c:44:19: error: expected identifier or '(' before '[' token ... –  Rio Feb 27 '12 at 10:12
    
edited again, sorry. –  vulkanino Feb 27 '12 at 10:18
    
I can't seem to access Table[j].myBufData[i].buf to store data, like memcpy(Table[j].myBufData[i].buf, buf, SOME_SIZE) -- am I missing something? –  Rio Feb 27 '12 at 10:59
    
please show the code you're using, can't help you otherwise. –  vulkanino Feb 27 '12 at 11:01

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