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I'm playing with the default arguments for my Settings class in my project, so that I have a bit fewer methods declared.

For instance, I have these methods declared:

class Settings
{
    // [..]

    int getCurrentUserID(); // returns current user id

    // you specify the user id
    int setSetting( int value, int user_id ); 
    // no user specified, use the current one, overloads the previous when called
    // with only 1 argument
    int setSetting( int value ); 
}

What I'd like to have is this simplified version:

class Settings
{
    // [..]

    int getCurrentUserID(); // returns current user id

    // automatically selects the current user if no ID is provided
    int setSetting( int value, int user_id = getCurrentUserID() ); 
}

But I get this error at compilation:

cannot call member function ‘int Settings::getCurrentUserID()’ without object

How could I tell the compiler to use the current instance (which is available through the this) of the Setting object to get the default value? Is this authorized, by the way?

share|improve this question
    
"How could I..." — you cannot. The standards says this cannot be used in this context, implicitly or explicitly (8.3.6/8, 8.3.6/9). –  n.m. Feb 27 '12 at 11:10
    
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/4901233/… ? –  ltjax Feb 27 '12 at 11:13
    
ltjax: yep, didn't find it myself... I suspected this had to be already on SO :) –  Gui13 Feb 27 '12 at 11:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The method getCurrentUserID() is not static, so you can only call it through an object. One option is to create 2 methods, like the ones bellow, this and call the one you need:

int setSetting(int value);

int setSetting(int value, int user_id);

Another option: assuming the ID is always positive, you can give a default negative ID on the method and verify inside the method if the method was called with an ID or not. Something like this:

int setSetting(int value, int user_id = -1) {
    if (user_id == -1) {
        this->setSetting(value, this.getCurrentUserID());
        return 0; //don't know what the function returns, but handle it the way you need
    }

    // rest of the function will be called recursively, but it's OK
    // because the ID is not -1!
}
share|improve this answer
    
"this" is a pointer.. you have to use -> –  andrea.marangoni Feb 27 '12 at 10:53
2  
I think it's better to have if (user_id == -1) user_id = getCurrentUserID()); as the first line and then continuing the function instead of calling itself. This would also avoid infinite recursion if getCurrentUserID() happens to be -1. –  Mr Lister Feb 27 '12 at 11:05
    
@riskio: you're right! Thanks for pointing it! –  jmpcm Feb 27 '12 at 11:19
    
@MrLister: good point! :) –  jmpcm Feb 27 '12 at 11:20
1  
Ok, I'll take yours: it shows the reason (non-static function) and a solution! Thanks! –  Gui13 Feb 27 '12 at 11:26

You have two good choices. First, assuming -1 is not a legal user_id:

class Settings
{
    // [..]

    int getCurrentUserID(); // returns current user id

    // automatically selects the current user if no ID is provided
    int setSetting( int value, int user_id = -1); 
};

int Settings::setSetting( int value, int user_id )
{
    if(user_id == -1) user_id = getCurrentUserID();
 ...

Alternatively:

class Settings
{
    // [..]

    int getCurrentUserID(); // returns current user id

    int setSetting( int value ) { return setSetting(value, getCurrentUserID() ); }

    int setSetting( int value, int user_id ); 
};
share|improve this answer
  1. Only static methods can be used as a default parameter values. This example works (verified):

    class Settings
    {
        // [..]
    
        static int getCurrentUserID(); // returns current user id
    
        // automatically selects the current user if no ID is provided
        int setSetting( int value, int user_id = getCurrentUserID() ); 
    };
    
  2. Default parameter values should be avoided in C++ not to complicate the code.

  3. It's a good practise overloading methods. I think your 1st example seems to look better and simplier that the other one with default value.

share|improve this answer
1  
"verified": how? –  phresnel Feb 27 '12 at 11:19
    
Just compiled it –  BlackBada Mar 1 '12 at 19:34
    
Unfortunately, compiling is not verification in C++ because of the many implementation defined and undefined behaviours. –  phresnel Mar 1 '12 at 21:19

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