Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm wondering how I can structure this example code to help avoid null pointer dereference panics:

package main

import "fmt"

type Astruct struct {
    Number int
    Letter string
}

type Bstruct struct {
    foo int
    AStructList *[]Astruct
}

type Cstruct struct {
    Bstruct
}

func (a *Astruct) String() string {
    return fmt.Sprintf("Number = %d, Letter = %s", a.Number, a.Letter)
}

func main() {
    astructlist := make([]Astruct, 3)      // line 1
    for i := range astructlist {           // line 2
        astructlist[i] = Astruct{i, "a"}   // line 3
    }                                      // line 4
    c := new(Cstruct)
    c.Bstruct = Bstruct{100, &astructlist} // line 6

    for _, x := range(*c.Bstruct.AStructList) {
        fmt.Printf("%s\n", &x)
    }
}

If I omit lines 1-4 and 6 of main(), I get a null pointer dereference panic. Short of checking if c != nil, is there a way to avoid these panics?

Thanks in advance for any help!

share|improve this question
    
your problem is not that c is a nil pointer, but that c.Bstruct.AStructList is a nil pointer –  newacct Feb 27 '12 at 23:13
    
Yes indeed. I understand where the error was coming from, but what I wanted to know (and probably didn't make clear in the original question) was "is there a better/more idiomatic way to avoid this problem?" I spent some time looking at the code and figure there must be a better way to structure the structs as to avoid hitting nil pointer problems. –  mtw Feb 27 '12 at 23:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In this particular case, you could use idiomatic Go. Change AStructList *[]Astruct to AStructList []*Astruct. For example,

package main

import "fmt"

type Astruct struct {
    Number int
    Letter string
}

type Bstruct struct {
    foo         int
    AStructList []*Astruct
}

type Cstruct struct {
    Bstruct
}

func (a *Astruct) String() string {
    return fmt.Sprintf("Number = %d, Letter = %s", a.Number, a.Letter)
}

func main() {
    astructlist := make([]*Astruct, 3)            // line 1
    for i := range astructlist {                  // line 2
        astructlist[i] = &Astruct{i, "a"}         // line 3 
    }                                             // line 4
    c := new(Cstruct)
    c.Bstruct = Bstruct{100, astructlist}         // line 6

    for _, x := range c.Bstruct.AStructList {
        fmt.Printf("%s\n", x)
    }
}

In general, it's your responsibility to either assign a non-nil value to a pointer or test for nil before its use. When you allocate memory without explicitly intializing it, it's set to the zero value for the type, which is nil for pointers.

The zero value

When memory is allocated to store a value, either through a declaration or a call of make or new, and no explicit initialization is provided, the memory is given a default initialization. Each element of such a value is set to the zero value for its type: false for booleans, 0 for integers, 0.0 for floats, "" for strings, and nil for pointers, functions, interfaces, slices, channels, and maps. This initialization is done recursively, so for instance each element of an array of structs will have its fields zeroed if no value is specified.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi peterSO, this is exactly what I was looking for. I didn't realize that I could define Bstruct.AStructList as a slice of pointers rather than a pointer to a slice of Astructs. Cheers! –  mtw Feb 27 '12 at 23:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.