Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

there are plenty of similar questions out there about calling functions by name dynamically. However, I can't find a solution to my specific problem where I have local functions inside a closure without exposing the functions to the public interface of my object.

Lets see some code (this is a fictional example)...

(function(window,$) {

  MyObject = (function($) {
    var obj = {};
    obj.publicMethod = function(number,otherarg) {
      this['privateMethod'+number].apply(this,[otherarg]);
    };

    var privateMethod1 = function(arg) {
      //do something with arg
    };

    var privateMethod2 = function(arg) {
      //do something else with arg
    };

    return obj;
  })($);

  window.MyObject = MyObject;
})(window,jQuery);

This doesn't work because "this" is MyObject and the local functions are not exposed. Also I'd like to be able to check if the function exists before trying to call it. eg.

var func_name = 'privateMethod'+number;
if($.isFunction(this[func_name])) {
  this[func_name].apply(this,[otherarg]);
}

I'm not really sure how to proceed, short of exposing my private functions to the public interface, it all works then.

obj.privateMethod1 = function(arg) {
  //do something with arg
};

obj.privateMethod2 = function(arg) {
  //do something else with arg
};

I'm running out of ideas. Your help and advise is greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot get a reference to a local variable by a string. You have to add the local objects to a namespace:

(function(window,$) {
  // Use "var MyObject = " instead of "MyObject = "!! Otherwise, you're assigning
  //  the object to the closest parent declaration of MyVar, instead of locally!
  var MyObject = (function($) {
    var obj = {};
    var local = {};  // <-- Local namespace
    obj.publicMethod = function(number,otherarg) {
      local['privateMethod'+number].call(this, otherarg);
    };

    var privateMethod1 = local.privateMethod1 = function(arg) {
      //do something with arg
    };

    var privateMethod2 = local.privateMethod2 = function(arg) {
      //do something else with arg
    };

    return obj;
  })($);

  window.MyObject = MyObject;
})(window,jQuery);
share|improve this answer

The private functions are local variables and not part of any object. So, the [...] notation for accessing a property is never going to work since there is no object the private functions are properties of.

Instead, you could make two objects: private and public:

var public  = {},
    private = {};

public.publicMethod = function(number, otherarg) {
  // `.apply` with a fixed array can be replaced with `.call`
  private['privateMethod' + number].call(this, otherarg);
};

private.privateMethod1 = function(arg) {
  //do something with arg
};

private.privateMethod2 = function(arg) {
  //do something else with arg
};

return public; // expose public, but not private
share|improve this answer
    
I had a feeling that was case, thanks for your help –  Rob Feb 27 '12 at 12:30
    
So straight forward... I had been singing the mantra to the point where I forgot what it meant. –  Ray Mar 11 at 1:58

The fact that you cannot call these functions from outside of the scope within which they are defined is a fundamental part of javascript, and indeed, all programming languages.

The only way to call these functions is to make them public. A convention based approach can be applied instead however. The underscore prefix is fairly ubiquitous and generally understood to mean "not intended to be called as a public function" eg:

obj._privateMethod1 = function(arg) {
  //...
};
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.