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Our application manages a table containing a per-user set of rows that is the result of a computationally-intensive query. Storing this result in a table seems a good way of speeding up further calculations.

The structure of that table is basically the following:

CREATE TABLE per_user_result_set
           ( user_login         VARCHAR2(N)
           , result_set_item_id VARCHAR2(M)
           , CONSTRAINT result_set_pk PRIMARY KEY(user_login, result_set_item_id)
           )
           ;

A typical user of our application will have this result set computed 30 times a day, with a result set consisting of between 1 single items and 500,000 items. A typical customer will declare about 500 users into the production database. So, this table will typically consist of 5 million rows.

The typical query that we use to update this table is:

BEGIN
    DELETE FROM per_user_result_set WHERE user_login = :x;
    INSERT INTO per_user_result_set(...) SELECT :x, ... FROM ...;
END;
/

After having run into performance issues (the DELETE part would take much time) we decided to have a GLOBAL TEMPORARY TABLE (on commit delete rows) to hold a “delta” of rows to suppress from the table and rows to insert into it:

BEGIN
    INSERT INTO _tmp
    SELECT ... FROM ...
     MINUS SELECT result_set_item_id
             FROM per_user_result_set
            WHERE user_login = :x;

    DELETE FROM per_user_result_set
          WHERE user_login = :x
            AND result_set_item_id NOT IN (SELECT result_set_item_id
                                             FROM _tmp
                                          );
    INSERT INTO per_user_result_set
    SELECT :x, result_set_item_id
      FROM _tmp;

    COMMIT;
END;
/

This has improved performance a bit, but still this is not satisfactory. So we're exploring ways to speed up that process and here are the issues that we experience:

  • We would have loved to use table partitioning (partitioning by user_login). But partitioning is not always available (on our test databases we hit ORA-00439). Our customers cannot all afford Oracle Enterprise Edition with paid additional features.
  • We could make the per_user_result_set table GLOBAL TEMPORARY, so that it is isolated and we can TRUNCATE it for example… but our application sometimes loses connection to Oracle due to network problems, and will automatically reconnect. By that time we lose the contents of our computation.
  • We could split that table into a certain number of buckets, make a view that UNIONs ALL all those buckets, and triggers INSTEAD OF UPDATE and DELETE on that view, and repart rows according to ORA_HASH(user_login) % num_buckets. But we are afraid this could make SELECT operations much slower. This would result in a constant number of tables, with smaller indexes affected in DELETE or INSERT operations. In short, “partioning table for the poor”.
  • We've tried to ALTER TABLE per_user_result_set NOLOGGING. This does not improve things much.
  • We've tried to CREATE TABLE ... ORGANIZATION INDEX COMPRESS 1. This speeds things up by a ratio of 1:5.
  • We've tried to have one table per user_login. That's exactly what we could have by partitioning using a number of partitions equal to the number of distinct user_logins and a well-chosen hash function. Performance factor is 1:10. But I would really like to avoid this solution: have to maintain a huge number of indexes, tables, views, on a per-user basis. This would be an interesting performance gain for the users, but not for us maintainers of the systems.
  • Since the users work at the same time there is no way that we create a new table and swap it with the old one.

What could you please suggest in complement to these approaches?

Note. Our customers run Oracle Databases from 9i to 11g, and XE editions to Enterprise edition. That's a wide variety of versions that we need to be compatible with.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
My first thought was to make the table an IOT, but you have done that, and it resulted in a 5x speed-up, is that correct? The only other thing I can think of is to avoid the delete. Somehow, use a sequence to age out the old result set each time a new query is run - ie, the table becomes user_login, result_set_id, result_set_item_id. You may need to track the latest result_set_id in the users table or something. Are you 100% sure the inserting / deleting is the problem, and the slow part is not finding the result_set_item_id? – Stephen ODonnell Feb 27 '12 at 13:57
    
@Stephen ODonnell: I'm sure most of the time is in the DELETE part. – Benoit Feb 27 '12 at 14:09
    
What have you done so far to gather detailed trace data? We can guess at solutions all we want, but you need data to really figure out the problem and fix it. Jonathan Lewis's book "Cost-Based Oracle Fundamentals" would be a great starting point. – Jim Hudson Feb 27 '12 at 14:33
    
Long shot, but are you using ASSM tablespaces? I've seen significant problems deleting and inserting large amounts of data - bug 4475314 for instance, but the 'fix' for that doesn't seem to have completely resolved it - which we could only resolve by moving the affected tables to MSSM. – Alex Poole Feb 27 '12 at 20:19

We've tried to have one table per user_login. That's exactly what we could have by partitioning using a number of partitions equal to the number of distinct user_logins and a well-chosen hash function. Performance factor is 1:10. But I would really like to avoid this solution: have to maintain a huge number of indexes, tables, views, on a per-user basis. This would be an interesting performance gain for the users, but not for us maintainers of the systems.

Can you then make a stored procedure to generate these table on a per-user basis? Or, better yet, have this stored procedure do the most appropriate thing depending on the licensure of Oracle being supported?

If Partitioning option 
  then create or truncate user-specific list partition
Else 
  drop user-specific result table
  Create user-specific result table 
      as Select from template result table
  create indexes
  create constraints
  perform grants
end if
Perform insert
share|improve this answer

If all your users were on 11g Enterprise Edition I would recommend you to use Oracle's built-in result-set caching rather than trying to roll your own. But that is not the case, so let's move on.

Another attractive option might be to use PL/SQL collections rather than tables. Being in memory these are faster to retrieve and require less maintenance. They are also supported in all the versions you need. However, they are session variables, so if you have lots of users with big result sets that would put stress on your PGA allocations. Also their data would be lost when the network connection drops. So that's probably not the solution you're looking for.

The core of your problem is this statement:

DELETE FROM per_user_result_set WHERE user_login = :x;

It's not a problem in itself but you have extreme variations in data distribution. Bluntly, the deletion of a single row is going to have a very different performance profile from the deletion of half a million rows. And because your users are constantly refreshing their data there is no way you can handle that, except by giving your users their own tables.

You say you don't want to have a table per user because

"[it] would be an interesting performance gain for the users, but not for us maintainers of the systems,"

Systems exist for the benefit of our users. Convenience for us is great as long as it helps us to provide better service to them. But their need for a good working experience trumps ours: they pay the bills.

But I question whether having individual tables for each user really increases the work load. I presume each user has their own account, and hence schema.

I suggest you stick with index-organized tables. You only need columns which are in the primary key and maintaining a separate index is unnecessary overhead (for both inserting and deleting). The big advantage of having a table per user is that you can use TRUNCATE TABLE in the refresh process, which is a lot faster than deletion.

So your refresh procedure will look like this:

BEGIN
    TRUNCATE TABLE per_user_result_set REUSE STORAGE;
    INSERT INTO per_user_result_set(...) 
          SELECT ...  FROM  ...;
    DBMS_STATS.GATHER_TABLE_STATS(user
          , 'PER_USER_RESULT_SET'
          , estimate_percent=>10);
    COMMIT;
END;
/

Note that you don't need to include the USER column any more, so yur table will just have the single column of result_set_item_id (another indication of the suitability of IOT.

Gathering the table stats isn't mandatory but it is advisable. You have a wide variability in the size of result sets, and you don't want to be using an execution plan devised for 500000 rows when the table has only one row, or vice versa.

The only overhead is the need to create the table in the user's schema. But presumably you already have some set-up for a new user - creating the account, granting privileges, etc - so this shouldn't be a big hardship.

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