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I have an aspx that has the following javascript function being ran during the onload event of the body.

<body onload="startClock();">

However, I'm setting the aspx up to use a master page, so the body tag doesn't exist in the aspx anymore. How do I go about registering the startClock function to run when the page is hit and still have it use a masterpage?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 22 down vote accepted

If you don't want to explicitly assign window.onload or use a framework, consider:

<script type="text/javascript">
function startClock(){
    //do onload work
}
if(window.addEventListener){
    window.addEventListener('load',startClock,false); //W3C
}
else{
    window.attachEvent('onload',startClock); //IE
}
</script>

http://www.quirksmode.org/js/events_advanced.html

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+1 - I was too lazy to type this answer, but this is the way I would suggest someone does it too, with the same assumptions you initially state. –  Jason Bunting Jun 3 '09 at 19:56
    
Of course, I would abstract the details a wee bit - hopefully that is obvious to the OP... –  Jason Bunting Jun 3 '09 at 19:57
    
I must be missing something real obvious here, but where does the 'if' block of code go? You can't just dump that in a <script> tag can you? –  Jagd Jun 3 '09 at 20:59
    
You can stick it all in a script tag. I updated my answer to reflect it. This will force the 'if' logic to execute as the script is parsed so the startClock event is ready onload. –  Corbin March Jun 3 '09 at 21:42
1  
Since non-MS browsers are pretty good about implementing W3C DOM Level 2 recommendations, the 'else' exists for IE only. As Jason mentioned, we could(should) abstract the details and while we're at it we could add caution(is this a browser that doesn't support either event reg. model, is this function already registered, etc). I opted for simplicity in my example. Worth a downvote? I dunno. –  Corbin March Jun 4 '09 at 16:08

Insert this anywhere in the body of the page:

<script type="text/javascript">
window.onload = function(){
    //do something here
}
</script>
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5  
The only problem with this one is if other code, also pulled into the composite page, does the same thing - last in wins. Redefining window.onload works, but care should be taken to make sure it hasn't already been defined! –  Jason Bunting Jun 3 '09 at 19:23
    
Very true! Thanks for the reminder. –  Gabriel Hurley Jun 3 '09 at 19:35
    
I have seen code that tests to see if window.onload is defined, and if so, refers to it in a temp variable, then "calls" that variable from within the new window.onload. –  Alan H. Aug 2 '11 at 21:28

The cleanest way is using a javascript framework like jQuery. In jQuery you could define the on-load function in the following way:

$(function() {
    // ...
});

Or, if you don't like the short $(); style:

$(document).ready(function() {
    // ...
});
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Agreed. I've actually started using jQuery a few months after posting this question (nearly a year ago now), and I love it. –  Jagd May 11 '10 at 21:37
    
Newer versions of jQuery require the $(document).ready(...) style. –  Doug Domeny Jun 23 '11 at 20:35
1  
No. In never versions the behaviour of $() changed, but $(some_function) did not change. –  ThiefMaster Jun 23 '11 at 22:18
Page.ClientScriptManager.RegisterStartupScrip(this.GetType(), "startup", "startClock();", true);

or using prototype

document.observe("dom:loaded", function() {
  // code here
});
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