Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is a List[List[Int]] of prime factors for integers 2..12:

List(List(2), List(3), List(2, 2), List(5), List(3, 2), 
     List(7), List(2, 2, 2), List(3, 3), List(5, 2), 
     List(11), List(3, 2, 2))

It needs to be flattened so that the resulting data structure contains only the longest sequence (greatest power) of each prime:

List(2,2,2,3,3,5,7,11)

For example, leaving out all but the greatest power of two:
List(List(2), List(3), List(2, 2), List(5), List(3, 2), List(7), List(2, 2, 2), List(3, 3), List(5, 2), List(11), List(3, 2, 2))

Within the initial list sub-lists of primes are always sorted in the descending order.

Struggling to find an elegant, preferably ≤O(n) solution.

My solution is far from ideal:

xs.flatMap(l=> l.groupBy(x=>x)).map(x=>(x._1,x._2.length)).
   groupBy(_._1).mapValues(_.maxBy(_._2)).values.
   map(x=>List.fill(x._2) (x._1)).flatten
share|improve this question
1  
I don't think you can get any better than O(N), you'll need to traverse all the lists, how can you do that in less than O(N)? –  zmbq Feb 27 '12 at 13:11
    
@zmbq, you're right, fixed. It's only a nice to have though. –  John 'Светлый' Well Feb 27 '12 at 13:26

3 Answers 3

This is a fair bit shorter than what you have; it's close enough conceptually that I expect you can figure it out:

xs.flatMap(_.groupBy(x=>x)).groupBy(_._1).
  flatMap(_._2.sortBy(- _._2.length).head._2).toSeq.sorted
share|improve this answer
    
this not much different on the qualitative level - alright for one-off scripting scenarios, but so is my initial clumsy solution. –  John 'Светлый' Well Feb 28 '12 at 13:30
    
Elegance is in the eye of the beholder, of course, but this isn't bad IMO. It's brief and it gets the job done. You didn't specify what exactly you want. If the Scala library had counted sets, it'd be easy. Custom merges work too, as you've shown, if you're willing to write a much longer solution. –  Rex Kerr Feb 28 '12 at 19:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

After some analysis the problem boils down to a simple merge of two sorted lists, but with a slight twist - it must add duplicate elements only once:

merge(List(5,3,3,2),List(7,5,3,2,2)

Must produce:

List(7,5,3,3,2,2)

Once there is such wonderful merge function the list of lists can be simply reduced from left to right.

Solution

def merge (xs:List[Int],ys:List[Int]):List[Int] = (xs,ys) match{
  case (Nil,_)         => ys
  case (_,Nil)         => xs
  case (x::xxs,y::yys) => if (x==y) x::merge(xxs,yys) 
                          else if (x>y) x::merge(xxs,ys) 
                          else y::merge(xs,yys)
}

// note the simplicity of application
ll reduce merge

Tail recursive version of merge - avoiding stack overflow on long lists :

def merge (xs:List[Int],ys:List[Int]) = {
  def m (rs:List[Int],xs:List[Int],ys:List[Int]):List[Int] = (xs,ys) match {
    case (Nil,_)         => ys reverse_:::rs
    case (_,Nil)         => xs reverse_:::rs
    case (x::xxs,y::yys) => if (x==y) m(x::rs,xxs,yys) 
                            else if (x>y) m(x::rs,xxs,ys) 
                            else m(y::rs,xs,yys)
  }

  m(Nil,xs,ys).reverse   
}

Faster imperative version of merge:

def merge (x:List[Int],y:List[Int]) = {
  var rs = new scala.collection.mutable.ListBuffer[Int]()
  var xs = x
  var ys = y
  while(!xs.isEmpty && !ys.isEmpty) {
    if (xs.head>ys.head) {
      rs+=xs.head
      xs=xs.tail
    } else if(xs.head==ys.head) {
      rs+=xs.head
      xs=xs.tail
      ys=ys.tail
    } else {
      rs+=ys.head
      ys=ys.tail          
    }
  }
  rs ++= xs ++= ys toList
}
share|improve this answer
val ll = List(List(2), List(3), List(2, 2), List(5), List(3, 2),  
     List(7), List(2, 2, 2), List(3, 3), List(5, 2), 
     List(11), List(3, 2, 2))
val s = ll.flatten toSet 
s.map (n => ll.map (l => (n, l.count (_ == n)))).map (l => (l(0) /: l.tail) ((a, b) => if (a._2 > b._2) a else b))

produces:

scala.collection.immutable.Set[(Int, Int)] = Set((7,1), (11,1), (2,3), (5,1), (3,2))

expanding the factors and sorting them, to generate List (2,2,2,3,3,5,7,11) is left as an exercise.

share|improve this answer
1  
.map(x=>List.fill(x._2) (x._1)).flatten will do the job –  John 'Светлый' Well Feb 27 '12 at 15:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.