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public class Outer
{
    public  class Inner
    {
        public static string OtherValue { get { return SomeValue; } }
    }

    public static string SomeValue { get { return "Outer"; } }
}

Why does the above compile? Isn't SomeValue out of scope in Inner and need qualifying with Outer.SomeValue? Isn't the above essentially the same as the below (which won't compile)?

public class Outer
{
    public class Inner
    {
        public static string OtherValue { get { return Outer.SomeValue; } }
    }

    public static string SomeValue { get { return "Outer"; } }
}

What static magic is going on here?

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1  
It is very confusing for you to name a nested class which is not a subclass "sub", and an outer class which is not a superclass "super"! –  Eric Lippert Feb 27 '12 at 15:57
    
Good point, cut/paste from another question, sorry. –  gingerbreadboy Feb 27 '12 at 16:53
    
Thanks for the amend :) –  gingerbreadboy Mar 2 '12 at 11:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The inner class inherits part of the outer class' scope. So members in Outer are accessible from within Sub, but they still belong to the outer class, which is why Sub.SomeValue does not work.

The technical term is lexical scope, and it means that a variable's scope covers the 'lexical' block it is in, that is, it is accessible anywhere within the source code block in which it is defined, including sub-blocks, regardless of run-time ownership. See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scope_%28programming%29#Lexical_scoping.

Languages like Javascript, Lisp, Haskell, and most other languages aimed at functional programming make extensive use of lexical scope, and it is closely related to other FP concepts such as partial function application, closures and currying.

Once you've gotten used to it, it can be an incredibly useful (and elegant) tool.

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It's all flooding back to me now :) –  gingerbreadboy Feb 27 '12 at 14:53

It is like:

public class Super
{
    public class Sub
    {
        public static string OtherValue { get { return Super.SomeValue; } }
    }

    public static string SomeValue { get { return "Outer"; } }
}

With Super holding the static SomeValue


It is more clearly displayed like:

public class Super
{
    public static string SomeValue { get { return "Outer"; } }
}

public class Sub
{
    public static string OtherValue { get { return Super.SomeValue; } }
}

Now with Sub and Super being public their static properties are visible to all within their shared scope. And as @jonskeet pointing out, the compiler will search for the best fit for SomeValue looking in the class Sub first since the value is used in that class.

Now something like this would not compile:

public class Super
{
    private static string SomeValue { get { return "Outer"; } }
}

public class Sub
{
    public static string OtherValue { get { return SomeValue; } }
}

However,

public class Super
{
    private static string SomeValue { get { return "Outer"; } }

    public class Sub
    {
        public static string OtherValue { get { return SomeValue; } }
    }
}

the above is fine due to the nesting of the classes.

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The question is WHY does this work, and WHAT is the reason. –  gingerbreadboy Feb 27 '12 at 14:49
    
@gingerbreadboy, I thought my code would explain the difference. However, I will update to better explain. Thank you for pointing that out. –  Joe Feb 27 '12 at 14:51

Sub is a nested class of Super, so any member of Super is in the scope of Sub. However, these "inherited" members are not members of Sub, so Sub.SomeValue is not valid. The compiler translates SomeValue into Super.SomeValue.

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It's to do with the meaning of simple names, which is dictated by section 7.6.2 of the C# 4 spec:

Otherwise for each instance type T (section 10.3.1), starting with the instance type of the immediately enclosing type declaration and continuing with the instance type of each enclosing class or struct declaration (if any):

  • ...
  • Otherwise, if a member lookup (section 7.4) of I in T with K type arguments produces a match:
    • [... not applicable here ...]
    • [... not applicable here ...]
    • Otherwise, the result is the same as a member access (section 7.6.4) of the form T.I [...]

So in other words, the compiler first checks whether Sub.SomeValue is valid, finds it isn't, then it checks Super.SomeValue, and finds it is.

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