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JavaScript: var functionName = function() {} vs function functionName() {}

In JavaScript, what's the purpose of defining a variable as a function? I've seen this convention before and don't fully understand it.

For example, at some point in a script, a function is called like this:

whatever();

But where I would expect to see a function named whatever, like this:

function whatever(){

}

Instead I'll see a variable called whatever that's defined as a function, like this:

var whatever = function(){

}

What's the purpose of this? Why would you do this instead of just naming the function?

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marked as duplicate by Shark, Christofer Eliasson, Mattias Jakobsson, JMax, Joe Feb 27 '12 at 20:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
They're called anonymous functions: helephant.com/2008/08/23/javascript-anonymous-functions –  Rory McCrossan Feb 27 '12 at 15:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Here's one reason:

var whatever;

if (some_condition) {
    whatever = function() {
        // Do something
    };
}
else {
    whatever = function() {
        // Do something else
    };
}
whatever();

You might see code like that in the initialization of a library that has to handle implementation differences (such as differences between web browsers, a'la IE's attachEvent vs. the standard addEventListener). You cannot do the equivalent with a function declaration:

if (some_condition) {
    function whatever() {    // <=== DON'T DO THIS
        // Do something
    }
}
else {
    function whatever() {    // <=== IT'S INVALID
        // Do something else
    }
}
whatever();

...they're not valid within control structures for reasons that will become clear in a moment.

Separately, there's a big difference between

var whatever = function() {
    // ...
};

and

function whatever() {
    // ...
}

The first is a function expression, and it's evaluated when the code reaches that point in the step-by-step execution of the context (e.g., the function it's in, or the step-by-step execution of global code). It also results in an anonymous function (the variable referring to it has a name, but the function does not, which has implications for helping your tools to help you).

The second is a function declaration, and it's evaluated upon entry to the context, before any step-by-step code is executed. (Some call this "hoisting" because something further down in the source happens earlier than something higher up in the source.) The function is also given a proper name.

So consider:

function foo() {
    doSomething();
    doSomethingElse();
    console.log("typeof bar = " + typeof bar); // Logs "function"

    function bar() {
    }
}

whereas

function foo() {
    doSomething();
    doSomethingElse();
    console.log("typeof bar = " + typeof bar); // Logs "undefined"

    var bar = function() {
    };
}

In the first example, with the declaration, the declaration is processed before the doSomething and other stepwise code is run. In the second example, because it's an expression, it's executed as part of the stepwise code and so the function isn't defined up above (the variable is defined up above, because var is also "hoisted").

And winding up: For the moment, you can't do this in general client-side web stuff:

var bar = function foo() { // <=== Don't do this in client-side code for now
    // ...
};

You should be able to do that, it's called a named function expression and it's a function expression that gives the function a proper name. But various JavaScript engines at various times have gotten it wrong, and IE continued to get very wrong indeed until very recently.

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When you assign a function to a variable, you can then pass it around as an argument to other functions, and also extend it to make use of Javascript's Object model.

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this is so you can store functions in variables and e.g. pass them to other functions as parameters. One example where this is usefull is in writing asynchronous functions which are passed callbacks as arguments

var callback = function() { console.log('done', result)}

var dosomething = function(callback) {
    //do some stuff here
    ...
    result = 1;
    callback(result);
}

Since functions are objects in javascript you can extend them with properties and methods as well.

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Functions in JavaScript are objects; they're values, in other words. Thus you can always set a variable to refer to a function regardless of how the function is defined:

function foo() { ... }

var anotherFoo = foo;
anotherFoo(); // calls foo

Functions are values that can be used as object properties, function parameters, array elements, and anything else a general value can do in JavaScript. They're objects and can have their own properties too.

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If you declare a functionvariable, using "var", within a function, the variable can only be accessed within that function. When you exit the function, the variable is destroyed. These variables are called local variables. You can have local variables with the same name in different functions, because each is recognized only by the function in which it is declared.

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