Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this nested data frame

test <- structure(list(id = c(13, 27), seq = structure(list(
`1` = c("1997", "1997", "1997", "2007"),
`2` = c("2007", "2007", "2007", "2007", "2007", "2007", "2007")), 
.Names = c("1", "2"))), .Names = c("penr", 
"seq"), row.names = c("1", "2"), class = "data.frame")

I want a list of all values in the second column, namely

result <- c("1997", "1997", "1997", "2007", "2007", "2007", "2007", "2007", "2007", "2007", "2007")

Is there an easy way to achieve this?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This line does the trick:

do.call("c", test[["seq"]])

or equivalent:

c(test[["seq"]], recursive = TRUE)

or even:

unlist(test[["seq"]])

The output of these functions is:

    11     12     13     14     21     22     23     24     25     26     27 
"1997" "1997" "1997" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007" 

To get rid of the names above the character vector, call as.character on the resulting object:

> as.character((unlist(test[["seq"]])))
 [1] "1997" "1997" "1997" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007" "2007"
[11] "2007"
share|improve this answer
    
great, thank you!!! –  speendo Feb 27 '12 at 15:21
    
Could you tick the mark below my answer? In that way everyone knows this question has been answered (and I get some rep :)) –  Paul Hiemstra Feb 27 '12 at 15:22
    
+1 for showing three good alternatives. –  Andrie Feb 27 '12 at 15:24
    
of course - but I have to wait for some minutes because of a limitation of stack exchange. You were too fast :) –  speendo Feb 27 '12 at 15:25
    
With this kind of questions one has to be fast, I am surprised that no other answers where not posted simultaneously by e.g. @Andrie ;). –  Paul Hiemstra Feb 27 '12 at 15:31
show 2 more comments

This is not an answer but a follow up/supplement to Paul's answer:

Consistently on any number of iterations the c method performs the best. However as I increased the number of iterations to 100000 unlist went from the poorest to very close to the c method.

1000 iterations

     test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
2       c         1000    0.04 1.333333      0.03        0         NA        NA
1 do.call         1000    0.03 1.000000      0.03        0         NA        NA
3  unlist         1000    0.23 7.666667      0.04        0         NA        NA

100,000 iterations

     test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
2       c       100000    8.39 1.000000      3.62        0         NA        NA
1 do.call       100000   10.47 1.247914      4.04        0         NA        NA
3  unlist       100000    9.97 1.188319      3.81        0         NA        NA

Again thanks for sharing Paul!

Benchmarking performed using rbenchmark on a win 7 machine running R 2.14.1

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the benchmark data! –  Paul Hiemstra Feb 27 '12 at 16:09
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.