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Why do we need to add the properties like

Properties props = System.getProperties();
    props.put("mail.smtp.starttls.enable", "true"); // added this line
    props.put("", host);
    props.put("mail.smtp.user", from);
    props.put("mail.smtp.password", pass);
    props.put("mail.smtp.port", "587");

Session session = Session.getDefaultInstance(props, null);

to the system properties to send a mail. Why should it be specifically system properties?

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How can things like your username, password be defaults? – adarshr Feb 27 '12 at 15:27
@adarshr: that was not what I meant. I just wanted to know why it is added to the system properties. – Ashwin Feb 27 '12 at 15:30
It is just a way to send a large number of parameters to a method. – adarshr Feb 27 '12 at 15:31
The question is perfectly valid. Why has it been downvoted? Most examples (and even the official JavaMail docs) use System.getProperties() instead of new Properties() – Aku Sep 4 '13 at 4:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You don't actually need to add them to the system properties.

If you create a new Properties instance and populate it with your attributes it will still work just the same.

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but still why is it always added to the system properties. Generally to set a property the setProperty method is called. What is the puProperty method. – Ashwin Feb 27 '12 at 15:30
Try Properties props = new Properties(); instead – Mark Robinson Feb 27 '12 at 15:35

They do NOT need to be System Properties. They can be java.util.Properties.

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As others have said, they don't need to be system properties. But, the following may be the reason why many examples show it this way: The Java Mail package supports a large number of settings/debug options. For example, lists 50 different settings for the SMTP provider alone.

Suppose you want to set this option: "mail.smtp.ssl.checkserveridentity". If you use the System properties as your starting point, then you can restart your Java process with


to change the option. If you build up your Properties object yourself from scratch, then you might need a code change to set the option.

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