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So I have a container div with a clickable slideshow element. When double clicking the next or previous button, the a few tags after the slideshow element get highlighted. If I disable the selection of the next div, the double click will select the next div.

As of now I'm using:

-webkit-touch-callout: none;
-webkit-user-select: none;
-khtml-user-select: none;
-moz-user-select: none;
-ms-user-select: none;
-o-user-select: none;
user-select: none;

This CSS doesn't work for me because I don't want to disable the selection of a div and all elements within the div, I just want to protect the div child elements from double click selection from another div. Is there a way to protect a div from selection?

share|improve this question

If you're looking to select all descendants from your div then do the following:

div * {
  -webkit-touch-callout: none;
  -webkit-user-select: none;
  -khtml-user-select: none;
  -moz-user-select: none;
  -ms-user-select: none;
  -o-user-select: none;
  user-select: none;
}

BUT, apparently there are issues with speed in this scenario, especially for production. I suggest modifying your HTML and select the div's direct descendants.

div h1,
div p,
div span/*, etc. */ {
  -webkit-touch-callout: none;
  -webkit-user-select: none;
  -khtml-user-select: none;
  -moz-user-select: none;
  -ms-user-select: none;
  -o-user-select: none;
  user-select: none;
}

If you would like to override the default inheritance of user-select: none on the div's children, then for each of those elements add user-select: text (including the cross-browser declarations).

share|improve this answer
    
Using * is fine for testing, but you should never use it in production code – Tom Feb 27 '12 at 16:08
    
You wanted to grab all descendants of a div. If you want to get more specific, use the asterisk selector on a class or ID. I really don't think this is worth a downvote. – Nick Beranek Feb 27 '12 at 16:10
1  
and the reason for this is that CSS parse from right to left NOT left to right. It means that first it takes ALL elements on the web site and then goes left, to check if they have parent div. this is SLOW. compare it to for example * #div - first it takes ONE element and then checks if its parent is anything - FAST. Without clear statement "don't do this this way in production" i agree it deserves down vote :) – mkk Feb 27 '12 at 16:11
1  
@Nick - make a quick change to something like this instead div h1, div p { } and write a note that he should add all his descendant elements like that and I'll be happy to change my downvote to an upvote – Tom Feb 27 '12 at 16:17
1  
Good edit. Upvoted – Tom Feb 27 '12 at 16:21

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