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I am currently working out of the Pro Asp.net mvc3 Framework book by Adam Freeman and Steven Sanderson Apress and I have run into an issue in ch.20(Jquery). Here is the example from the book. Listing 20-1. The Sample Application Index.cshtml View

@using MvcApp.Models;
@model IEnumerable<Summit>
@{
ViewBag.Title = "List of Summits";
}
<h4>Summits</h4>
<table>
<thead>
</thead>
@foreach (Summit s in Model) {
<tr>
<td>@s.Name</td>
<td>@s.Height</td>
<td>
@using (Html.BeginForm("DeleteSummit", "Home")) {
@Html.Hidden("name", @s.Name)
<input type="submit" value="Delete" />
}
</td>
</tr>
}
</table>
@Html.ActionLink("Add", "AddSummit")
@using (Html.BeginForm("ResetSummits", "Home")) {
<input type="submit" value="Reset" />
}

The view model for this view is a sequence of Summit objects, where the summit class has two properties: Name and Height. In the controller, we generate some example summits and pass them to the view, generating the HTML shown in Listing 20-2.

Here is my code: Submit Model code

public class Summit

    {
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public int Height { get; set; }
}

SummitController

public ActionResult Index()
{
    Summit[] summit = new Summit[10];
    summit[0].Height = 1;
    summit[0].Name = "himan";
    return View();
}

Index.cshtml

@using MvcApp.Models;
@model IEnumerable<Summit>
@{
ViewBag.Title = "List of Summits";
}
<h4>Summits</h4>
<table>
<thead>
</thead>
@foreach (Summit s in Model) {
<tr>
<td>@s.Name</td>
<td>@s.Height</td>
<td>
@using (Html.BeginForm("DeleteSummit", "Home")) {
@Html.Hidden("name", @s.Name)
<input type="submit" value="Delete" />
}
</td>
</tr>
}
</table>
@Html.ActionLink("Add", "AddSummit")
@using (Html.BeginForm("ResetSummits", "Home")) {
<input type="submit" value="Reset" />
}

Whenever I run this code. I always get Object reference not set to an instance of an object. I'm new to mvc3 so I'm not quite understanding where this issue is coming from.

share|improve this question
    
Can you please post the stack trace ? –  Micah Armantrout Feb 27 '12 at 15:36
    
At what line do you get the exception? –  Rune FS Feb 27 '12 at 15:38
    
Line 12: <tr><th>Name</th><th>Height</th><th></th></tr> Line 13: </thead> Line 14: @foreach (Summit s in Model) { Line 15: <tr> Line 16: <td>@s.Name</td> –  MasterP Feb 27 '12 at 15:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In your SummitController you did not pass the value to the View:

public ActionResult Index()
{
    Summit[] summit = new Summit[10];
    summit[0].Height = 1;
    summit[0].Name = "himan";
    return View(summit);
}

Also be sure to give to the view the model that it wants : its expecting IEnumerable not Array of Summit[]

Further edit regarding your comment : I would use a List<> like this:

 public ActionResult Index()
    {
        List<string> mylist = new List<string>();
        mylist.Add("test2");
        mylist.Add("test3");
        mylist.Add("test4");

        IEnumerable<string> myIEnumebrableList = mylist;

        return View(myIEnumebrableList);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
could you clarify what you mean by its expecting IEnumerable not Array of Summit[] –  MasterP Feb 27 '12 at 15:45
    
in your views, what you put as @model is what the controller should pass via the return View(). In your case : the view model is : model IEnumerable<Summit> , and you should pass it a IEnumerable<Summit>. –  Alex Peta Feb 27 '12 at 15:46
    
Would this be going in the right direction? return View(IEnumerable(summit)); –  MasterP Feb 27 '12 at 15:52
    
you can use List<T> instead of Array and work with List. i've updated my comment with a string example. –  Alex Peta Feb 27 '12 at 16:06
    
thx for all your help –  MasterP Feb 27 '12 at 16:32

MasterP,

IF the issue is related to the model being passed in, then try the following:

public ActionResult Index()
{
    Summit[] summit = new Summit[10];
    for (int index = 0; index < summit.Length; index++)
    {
        summit[index] = new Summit();
    }
    summit[0].Height = 1;
    summit[0].Name = "himan";
    return View(summit.AsEnumerable());
}

this ensures that the model is both passed in AND is enumerable explicitly. Also, notice the line: summit[index] = new Summit();. this is required as setting an array of objects (summit) initializes them all as null objects, rather than new class members.

My personal feeling is that in real-life, you'd initialize Summit as an IList<Summit>

share|improve this answer
    
thx for all your help –  MasterP Feb 27 '12 at 16:32
    
mp -no worries, glad to have been instrumental in your 'discovery' :) –  jim tollan Feb 27 '12 at 16:38

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