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If I write the following code:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  cout << &(int &&)123 << endl;
  return 0;
}

Then g++ complains:

foo.cc: In function ‘int main()’:
foo.cc:7:20: error: taking address of xvalue (rvalue reference)

Ok, thanks to What are rvalues, lvalues, xvalues, glvalues, and prvalues? I get that an xvalue means that it's about to "expire", which makes sense. But now if I do this:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  const int &x = (int &&)123;
  cout << &x << endl;
  return 0;
}

This "works" just fine and will print an address. So, I have a few questions:

  1. If the value is about to expire, why can I make a reference to it? The reference won't keep the original object alive (right?).
  2. Does such a reference result in undefined behavior? E.g. because we're referencing an object that may have been destroyed?

In general is there a way to know the lifetime of an rvalue reference?

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3  
Binding to a const reference will keep the value alive. –  Bo Persson Feb 27 '12 at 16:07
    
Yes. you can only have a const ref and a ordinary ref. I think this is allowed for backward compatibility with c++03 where you could bind the const ref to a object returned by value. –  balki Feb 27 '12 at 18:35
    
@BoP I think you have it wrong. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 27 '12 at 22:26
    
@Johannes - In that case, I'm not sure. Otherwise I would be. :-) –  Bo Persson Feb 28 '12 at 7:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Clause 12.2, paragraphs 4-5, says that the lifetime is extended in the second example

There are two contexts in which temporaries are destroyed at a different point than the end of the full-expression. ...

The second context is when a reference is bound to a temporary. The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference except:
(none of the exceptions apply here)

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Perhaps I'm alone but I think that this is not safe:

const int &x = (int &&)123;

The lifetime-lengthening rules apply only when the reference is initialized by an expression that directly refers to a temporary object. In other words, the expression has carry the "temporary" attribute. If you omit the (int&&), then for binding to the reference, the compiler will implicitly create a prvalue expression that refers to a temporary object which is initialized by the value 123 and lifetime lengthening then applies.

But if you mix rvalue references in between, the compiler has no way to know at compile time whether or not to lengthen the lifetime of the referred-to object.

int a = 0;
const int &x = ((rand() == 42) ? (int&&)123 : (int&&)a);

I therefor think that your code has undefined behavior, because you evaluate a dangling reference (even if only for taking its address).

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I wonder if this code first creates a temporary int and binds that to x... –  Xeo Feb 28 '12 at 0:30
    
Interesting -- I tried the code snipped you suggested in g++ and it had no complaints. Can the compiler just decide to extend the lifetime of both? Or is there a requirement that the one is destroyed after evaluation? –  FatalError Feb 28 '12 at 14:57
1  
@fatal the compiler is not required to complain on undefined behavior. if you try your code with a class that has a destructuor you will observe that gcc destroys the temporary early . –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 28 '12 at 19:56
1  
Wouldn't the compiler have the same difficulty with the apparently legal const int &x = ((rand() == 42) ? 123 : a);? –  Dan Nissenbaum Dec 19 '12 at 7:32

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