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There are a lot of Javascript MVC frameworks available these days (Backbone.js, Cappuccino, Ember.js, GWT, etc), each having their own positives and negatives. My questions are ;

  1. What are the actual benefits that the MVC framework provides over normal Javascript ?
  2. Are all the frameworks mostly based on jQuery ?
  3. How does one decide which framework to go for? What are the questions that one needs to ask before pinpointing on some framework?
  4. One specific question that I have regarding MVC is there are some frameworks which update the view as soon as the model/data changes… So is that possible through AJAX?

Please let me know in very basic practical terms..

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closed as primarily opinion-based by halfer, templatetypedef, Qantas 94 Heavy, Salvador Dali, Delan Azabani Nov 4 '13 at 0:39

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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possible duplicate of Which JavaScript framework (jQuery vs Dojo vs ... )? –  dynamic Feb 27 '12 at 16:42
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It's not a duplicate of that question. Testndtv is asking about mvc frameworks, you are referring to a question about mostly dom-manipulating, visual frameworks. –  laurens peeters Feb 27 '12 at 16:44
    
@laurens peeters : Absolutely correct...I am referring to Javascript MVC frameworks SPECIFICALLY and not the normal jQuery, Dojo, Mojo, etc –  testndtv Feb 27 '12 at 16:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Benefits:

    • Reusable code
    • Separation of view logic from business logic
    • Easier to maintain / document
  2. No. For example, ExtJS's origins come from GWT (if I remember right)

  3. You look at the complexity and scale of what you're trying to do and weigh the pros and cons of the frameworks learning curve / expense (both time and monetary) against the features you need. For example, if you need powerful data grids and advanced widgets, extJS may be the way to go. However, if you need something lighter, Django may be a better option (just an example)
  4. Yes, all of that is done via AJAX. In ExtJS 4, when you add a record to a store attached to a grid, the grid automatically updates.

I hope this helps.

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ExtJS is from yui –  SriN Feb 7 '13 at 22:00

MVC gives architectural benefits over standard JavaScript - it helps you to write better organised, and therefore more maintainable code. It's a pattern that has been used and extensively tested over multiple languages and generations of programmers. Chances are, if you want to do something, someone else has already done it, so using a time-tested pattern helps you leverage the pattern's benefits, without making the mistakes that earlier programmers made, thus saving you time and effort

Backbone is not based on jQuery, but it is compatible with jQuery and gives you some goodies if you use it, e.g. in Views it gives you a cached reference to the views container in $el. But if you use Zepto instead of jQuery, $el is wrapped in Zepto functionality not jQuery.

YUI has MVC components and is completely not based on jQuery ;)

One decides which framework to use based on the needs of the current project, the documentation for the framework, the community it is based on, etc. The same as choosing which JS library to use, or which backend framework to use, etc. What's right for one person/project may not be right for another person/project

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  • What are the actual benefits that the MVC framework provides over normal Javascript ?
  • Frameworks are usefull when you need to organize your code and separate concerns in your application
  • Are all the frameworks mostly based on jQuery ?
  • MVC frameworks have nothing to do with jQuery , jQuery is mainly here to do DOM manipulation , animation , but they can have features that you can find in jquery like an event System , Ajax , etc ... How does one decide which framework to go for? What are the questions that one needs to ask before pinpointing on some framework?
  • You need to test them , write an app without frameworks, then try to refactor your code with a framework and see if it is easy to work with or not.
  • One specific question that I have regarding MVC is there are some frameworks which update the view as soon as the model/data changes… So is that possible through AJAX?

  • they all do that somehow, that's the purpose of MVC. when the model changes , the view is notified and re-renders itself ... but they do that in different ways.

Now , in my opinion , with jQuery , one should not really need a "external" MVC framework , because jQ already has a built in event system , a lot of helper functions , and javascript objects are dynamic enough in to attach any behaviour on the fly to them without defining "classes" of objects.

My point is : you can do your own MVC with jQuery, all the tools are already in the library.

IF you need other things , like a "router" , validation helpers ,scaffholding , etc ... then a MVC framework is the way to go.

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I wouldn't say they all re-render views automatically when the model changes. Backbone leaves it up to you to implement the rendering of views, including the re-rendering of them following model changes. One still requires MVC (or some other architectural pattern) when using jQuery. It has been established that jQuery alone is not designed for, nor useful in creating 'large', non-trivial JavaScript applications, see: blog.rebeccamurphey.com/on-jquery-large-applications –  danwellman Feb 27 '12 at 17:10
    
of course , it is up to you to code the behaviour of the view when the model changes , a framework is not a magical stuff where you would just have to put the .js file in your html in order for it to work. –  mpm Feb 27 '12 at 17:17
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not at all, some frameworks, such as Knockout.js, do magically re-render your views for you when model data changes. And if you know that, why did you say they all do that somehow, that's the purpose of MVC? –  danwellman Feb 27 '12 at 17:46
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Knockout is not MVC at all in my opinion. it's more like mvvm or mvp. –  mpm Feb 27 '12 at 17:49
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Conceeded, it is definitely mvvm. Backbone is also considered not truly MVC, but instead 'within the MV* family', which Knockout could also be considered to be within –  danwellman Feb 27 '12 at 18:55

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