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For some reason this does not look correct. Is there a better way to write/refractor this?

if (!(auth.DoesAuthMatch && auth.DoesEmailMatch))
{
    statusText = "Access Denied";
}

I think I have a 'case of the Mondays!..'

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2  
DeMorgan's laws: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Morgan's_laws –  siride Feb 27 '12 at 17:00
    
always look en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Morgan%27s_laws –  rerun Feb 27 '12 at 17:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Refactor to a method:

private bool IsAccessDenied(Auth auth)
{
    return !(auth.DoesAuthMatch && auth.DoesEmailMatch);
}

if (IsAccessDenied(auth))
{
    statusText = "Access Denied";
}

As for the Boolean logic:

!(auth.DoesAuthMatch && auth.DoesEmailMatch) == 
(!auth.DoesAuthMatch || !auth.DoesEmailMatch)

A simple application of De Morgan's Laws.

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1  
Why should it be refactored to a method? –  siride Feb 27 '12 at 17:59
    
@siride: So that you must chase down the called method just to see what the code does. Although the logic is clear, trying to understand the code is harder in my view. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 27 '12 at 18:02
    
I chose @Oded as it shows examples PLUS other solutions and a link to a resource. All of the responses were about the same, just slight variations. I used (!(auth.DoesAuthMatch && auth.DoesEmailMatch)) Thanks for everyone's response early on a Monday. –  David K Egghead Feb 27 '12 at 18:10
    
@JonathanWood: yes, it just seems unnecessary for such a simple piece of logic. Certainly several lines of auth-checking code, reused throughout a project should be in a single method, but not this. –  siride Feb 27 '12 at 18:35
    
@siride - Readability is also a factor. There is now a function with a descriptive name explaining the what of the function, in case the how changes in the future. –  Oded Feb 27 '12 at 19:58

It is fine - the equivalent would be :

if (!auth.DoesAuthMatch || !auth.DoesEmailMatch)
{
    statusText = "Access Denied";
}
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The code looks right. But may be a bit more readable as:

if (!auth.DoesAuthMatch || !auth.DoesEmailMatch)

Or maybe even:

if (auth.DoesAuthMatch == false || auth.DoesEmailMatch == false)
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Comparing boolean values to true/false should be a fireable offence... –  Oded Feb 27 '12 at 17:02
1  
@Oded: Did you have a reason for that, or are you just being dogmatic? –  Jonathan Wood Feb 27 '12 at 17:03
    
I find such constructs to be redundant and less readable. Call it a matter of style if you will. –  Oded Feb 27 '12 at 17:05
2  
It is a matter of style. However, looking at my examples above, I personally find that the clearest version of the two. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 27 '12 at 17:09
    
@JonathanWood: but if you read it out load, the one with ! sounds better. It's easy for me to say and parse "if not auth.DoesAuthMatch" than "if auth.DoesAuthMatch equals false". Still a matter of style, I guess. –  siride Feb 27 '12 at 17:58

What's wrong with just inverting it? I find that positive logic is quicker to understand when reading code.

e.g.:

if (auth.DoesAuthMatch && auth.DoesEmailMatch)
{     
    statusText = "Access Granted"; 
}
else
{
    statusText = "Access Denied";
}
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Well you could change it to...

if (!auth.DoesAuthMatch || !auth.DoesEmailMatch) statusText = "Access Denied";
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