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I am trying to get the names of the children tags with python's sax library. I am using ContentHandler as the handler. Anyone has an idea how obtain the tag names?

Let's assume our xml document looks like:

<root>
    <parent>
        <child1>X</child1>
        <child2>Y</child2>
    </parent>
</root>

And let's assume we use the template for the handler:

class parserSAXHandler(handler.ContentHandler):

    def __init__(self):
                pass;
    def startElement(self, name, attrs):
                pass;
    def endElement(self,name):
                pass;
    def characters(self, content):
                pass;

How can I obtain the strings "child1" and "child2" assuming that I only know the name of the parent?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

SAX-style parsers require that you keep track of all the state you need, such as which tags you've seen. At a nminimum, what you need to do is write a startElement() handler that sets a flag when it sees a <parent> tag and an endElement() that clears that flag when it sees the closing tag. The startElement() handler also needs to accumulate tags it's seen in a list when this flag is set.

class parserSAXHandler(handler.ContentHandler):

    def __init__(self):
        self.parentflag = False
        self.childlist  = []

    def startElement(self, name, attrs):
        if name == "parent":
           self.parentflag = True
        elif self.parentflag:
           self.childlist.append(name)

    def endElement(self,name):
        if name == "parent":
            self.parentflag = False

After parsing, the instance's childlist attribute will have the list you want.

You may need more sophisticated logic if it's possible for additional tags to be nested inside <child> tags and you don't want these tag names. As it is, any tag nested inside a <parent> container at any level is included. The easiest way to keep track of nesting is probably with a stack: push each opening tag, pop each closing tag, and then you can just check to see if parent is at the top of the stack.

class parserSAXHandler(handler.ContentHandler):

    def __init__(self):
        self.tagstack   = []
        self.childlist  = []

    def startElement(self, name, attrs):
        if self.tagstack[-1] == "parent":
           self.childlist.append(name)
        self.tagstack.append(name)

    def endElement(self,name):
        if name == self.tagstack[-1]:
            self.tagstack.pop()
        else:
            raise SAXParseException("tag closed without being open")

A DOM-style parser, such as xml.dom.minidom or lxml, is a lot easier to work with for these kinds of tasks because it keeps track of the relationships between elements for you. Such a parser may be a better choice for your needs:

from xml.dom.minidom import parseString

xml = """
    <root>
        <parent>
            <child1>X</child1>
            <child2>Y</child2>
        </parent>
    </root>
"""

dom = parseString(xml)
children = [c.localName for p in dom.getElementsByTagName("parent")
            for c in p.childNodes if c.nodeType == c.ELEMENT_NODE]

You'll notice that once the minidom module has parsed our XML, your query is a single Python statement (which contains two loops, of course, but it's a single statement nonetheless). You can't really achieve that level of conciseness with a SAX-style parser.

Now, SAX-style parsers are faster and use less memory than DOM parsers, which was important ten years ago, but the gap is much smaller on modern processors, especially on smallish documents. Programmer time is much more valuable.

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