Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to remove a particular element from Arraylist, it throws an ConcurrentModificationException

ArrayList<String> ar = new ArrayList<String>();
ar.add("a");
ar.add("b");
ar.add("c");
ar.add("a");
ar.add("e");
for(String st: ar){
    System.out.println("st="+st);
    if(st.equals("a")){
        ar.remove(st);
    }
}

any comments, what am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Only remove an element from the array while iterating by using Iterator.remove().

The line for(String st: ar) { is a bit misleading. You're actually creating an iterator behind the scenes which is being used for this iteration. If you need to remove elements from within the iteration, you need to explicitly use an iterator so that you can call iterator.remove().

ArrayList<String> ar = new ArrayList<String>();
ar.add("a");
ar.add("b");
ar.add("c");
ar.add("a");
ar.add("e");
Iterator<String> it = ar.iterator();
while (it.hasNext()) {
    String st = it.next();
    System.out.println("st="+st);
    if (st.equals("a")) {
        it.remove();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You're removing an element from a collection while you're iterating over that collection, without using the iterator to do it. Don't do that. There are lots of alternatives, primarily:

  • Use indexes instead (get, removeAt) being careful about your counts so that you don't skip over items

     for (int i = 0; i < ar.size(); i++) {
         String st = ar.get(i);
         System.out.println("st="+st);
         if(st.equals("a")) {
             ar.removeAt(i);
             i--; // We want to use this index again
         }
     }
    
  • Build up a collection of items to remove, then remove them all afterwards

    List<String> elementsToRemove = new ArrayList<String>();
    for(String st: ar){
        System.out.println("st="+st);
        if(st.equals("a")){
            elementsToRemove.add(st);
        }
    }
    ar.removeAll(elementsToRemove);
    
  • Remove using the iterator, if the iterator supports removal (as ArrayList's does)

    for (Iterator<String> it = ar.iterator(); it.hasNext(); ) {
        String st = it.next();
        System.out.println("st="+st);
        if(st.equals("a")) {
            it.remove();
        }
    }
    
share|improve this answer

you are modifing the array you are iterating on. I suggest you to use the Iterator to do similar things.

share|improve this answer
    
The for-each syntax already uses an Iterator. –  Steve Kuo Feb 27 '12 at 18:33
    
thank you for the specification. A novice like me learns from the comments as well :) –  MaVVamaldo Feb 27 '12 at 18:48
    
@SteveKuo For-each does use an iterator but it is not possible to call its remove() method, so what maVVamaldo said is good advice if it is interpreted as "use an explicit operator", since that would allow safe deletion via Iterator.remove(). –  Michał Kosmulski Feb 29 '12 at 19:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.