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I have a Thread that starts in my main form

    private void changePasswordbutton_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        waitForm.Show();
        Thread thread = new Thread(ProcessInkPresenter);
        thread.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
        thread.Start();
        thread.Join();
        waitForm.Hide();
        waitForm.Dispose();
    }

I want to close the waitForm inside the ProcessInkPresenter method (which is running on a thread) instead of waiting for the thread to complete.

How do I do this?

Thanks

Method signatures

private void ProcessInkPresenter()

Defined in the class header

Wait waitForm;
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1  
Would stackoverflow.com/a/8443732/555547 work? Not sure about how Thread joining affects that. –  Jason Feb 27 '12 at 17:21
    
Why are you using a thread here at all? Why not just call ShowDialog on that other form instead? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 27 '12 at 17:53
    
Its a very complicated story. I need a thread for using Watin features. The thread parses HTML to see if the password changed. So I need to make the WaitForm disappear if successful. We only know if its successful from inside the thread. I can't use WaitFoorm.Close from inside the thread because .Net won't allow it! –  Cocoa Dev Feb 27 '12 at 18:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your original code doesn't make sense. It shows a form, then starts a thread, then waits for that thread to complete. If you want the form to be run on it's own UI thread, have ProcessInkPresenter run on the same UI thread (which it should if it interacts with the UI) and have the form closed and be disposed of when ProcessInkPresenter completes, try this:

private void changePasswordbutton_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Thread thread = new Thread(state => {
            using (var waitForm = new WaitForm()) {
                waitForm.Activated += (s, e) => {
                    ProcessInkPresenter();
                    waitForm.Hide();
                }
                Application.Run(waitForm);
            }
        }
    );
    thread.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
    thread.Start();
}

If the worker thread does not have to interact with the GUI, then what you want is something like the following. Note that I make use of Invoke to make sure that the interaction with the UI is done on the UI thread. There is no need to check InvokeRequired here, since I already know for sure that I am on a background thread.

If you want to keep the same waitForm instance:

private void changePasswordbutton_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Thread thread = new Thread(state => {
            try {
                ProcessInkPresenter();

                // If ProcessInkPresenter fails, this line will never execute
                waitForm.Invoke(new Action(()=>waitForm.Hide()));
            }
            catch (Exception ex) {
                // You probably want to do something with ex here,
                // rather than just swallowing it.
            }
        });
    thread.SetApartmentState(ApartmentState.STA);
    thread.Start();
    waitForm.Show();
}

NOTE: It doesn't make sense to dispose your WaitForm if you have a single instance of it (your Wait instance). Either construct an instance each time you use it, or never dispose it and use .Hide() instead.

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Basically this is what I am trying to achieve. The user clicks the button. I display a Form (called waitForm) and size it to the width and height of the screen. The wait form displays a message while the thread does it's own thing. If the thread finishes successfully, I want the waitForm to disappear and only leave the ResultForm on screen. (ResultForm is created within the thread). –  Cocoa Dev Feb 27 '12 at 17:42
    
Does the background process need to interact with the GUI in any way? –  Chris Shain Feb 27 '12 at 19:00
    
The background process opens up IE and then starts parsing HTML. It doesn't have anything to do with the GUI. If the results are positive/negative, we launch a new Form that displays the results. –  Cocoa Dev Feb 27 '12 at 19:03
    
See my second example, just added. –  Chris Shain Feb 27 '12 at 19:12
1  
It does. The code that I demonstrate above links the closing of the form to the completion of your ProcessInkPresenter method. If your ProcessInkPresenter doesn't exit, how could my code possibly know when to close the form? –  Chris Shain Feb 27 '12 at 20:55

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