Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on ubuntu 10.04 and a gcc. I have a binary file with my own magic number. When I read the file, the magic number is not the same. The streams seams to be correct.

Writing magic number :

std::fstream chfile;
chfile.open(filename.c_str(), std::fstream::binary | std::fstream::out);
if (chfile.good())
{
    chfile << (unsigned char)0x02 << (unsigned char)0x46 << (unsigned char)0x8A << (unsigned char)0xCE;
    // other input
    chfile.close();
}

Reading magic number :

std::fstream chfile;
chfile.open(filename.c_str(), std::fstream::binary | std::fstream::in);
if (chfile.good())
{
    unsigned char a,b,c,d;
    chfile >> a;
    chfile >> b;
    chfile >> c;
    chfile >> d;
    printlnn("header must : " << (int)0x02 << ' ' << (int)0x46 << ' ' << (int)0x8A << ' ' << (int)0xCE); // macro for debugging output
    printlnn("header read : " << (int)a << ' ' << (int)b << ' ' << (int)c << ' ' << (int)d);
    chfile.close();
}

When I use 02 46 8A CE as magic number it's alright (as the output says):

header must : 2 70 138 206
header read : 2 70 138 206

but when I use EA 50 0C C5 then the output is :

header must : 234 80 12 197
header read : 234 80 197 1

and the last 1 is a legit value for the next input. So why differ they and how do I fix this ?

share|improve this question
    
There were no fstreams in STL, plus I highly doubt you're using it. –  Fanael Feb 27 '12 at 17:50
    
@Fanael Did I wrote STL's fstream ? In the Title it says std::fstream. If so, are there people, who are allowed to change the title ? –  JoshuaBehrens Mar 30 '12 at 0:05
    
Yes, you did. See the revision history. –  Fanael Apr 4 '12 at 11:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the second case, operator>> is skipping over the character value 12. operator>> recognizes 12 as whitespace, and skips it, searching for the next valid character.

Try using an unformatted input operation (like chfile.read() or chfile.get()) instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. Fixed the problem. –  JoshuaBehrens Feb 28 '12 at 10:31
    
@JoshuaBehrens, I'm glad your experience on StackOverflow was positive. Please upvote each helpful answer (click on the upward-facing triangle), and accept the best answer (click on the check-mark.) Then go read other people's questions and answer them, if you can. –  Robᵩ Feb 28 '12 at 14:26
    
I'm just registered but I'm using stackoverflow since 3(?) years. But thanks for your help. –  JoshuaBehrens Mar 30 '12 at 0:07

You shouldn't use << and >> with binary files, they are used for formatted reading and writing.
In particular, they do special handling of whitespace such as 0xC (i.e. formfeed), which makes them unsuitable for binary I/O.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help. Fixed the problem. –  JoshuaBehrens Feb 28 '12 at 10:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.