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Is it possible to define two different template (by number of template arguments) classes with the same name?

Here's what I am trying to do:

namespace MyNamespace
{

template<class TRet>
class FunctionObject
{
    typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
    virtual ReturnType const operator()() const = 0;
};


template<class TRet, class TArg0>
class FunctionObject
{
    typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
    typedef typename TArg0 FirstArgumentType;
    virtual ReturnType const operator()(FirstArgumentType const &arg) const = 0;
};

}

I get an error mentioning too many template arguments at the end of closing bracket of the second FunctionObject struct definition.

I know this can be done in C#, but wasn't sure about C++. Can someone please shed some light here?

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean that can be done in C#? C# does not have templates. –  user405725 Feb 27 '12 at 17:33
    
I think they mean with generics in C#. –  Hunter McMillen Feb 27 '12 at 17:34
    
Concept of Generics in C#. –  user460762 Feb 27 '12 at 17:35
    
@user460762 Templates aren't generics. It's best to assume they have nothing in common besides the one use case they share. (This is not saying what you're trying to do can't be done in C++, just that "this can be done in C#" isn't relevant.) –  millimoose Feb 27 '12 at 17:38
    
@Inerdial Agreed, I wasn't trying to compare feature, but merely usage to give a clear understanding to those who are familiar with both languages. Thanks. –  user460762 Feb 27 '12 at 17:44

4 Answers 4

I think partial specialization would do the trick:

namespace MyNamespace {

  template<class TRet, class TArg0>
  class FunctionObject
  {
      typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
      typedef typename TArg0 FirstArgumentType;
      virtual ReturnType const operator()(FirstArgumentType const &arg) const = 0;
  };

  template<class TRet>
  class FunctionObject<TRet,void>
  {
      typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
      virtual ReturnType const operator()() const = 0;
  };

}

You could also start with a primary template with more than one parameter.

I think C++11 its variadic templates allows this to be more nifty, but I hadn't had the time to play with this, so I'd better leave that to someone else to show.

share|improve this answer
    
Yea, I thought about it, but if I want to create another class with three template arguments then I will have to modify the current ones to include void arguments for inapplicable ones. Good suggestion though. Thanks. –  user460762 Feb 27 '12 at 17:42
    
@user460762: Yes, you will have to start with the maximum number of arguments you want to be able to deal with. Some people dealt with this by relying on macro meta hackery. But, as I said, variadic templates would do the trick. –  sbi Feb 27 '12 at 17:46
1  
Why not define just one class template and provide default argument for second template parameter? –  Nawaz Feb 27 '12 at 17:46
1  
@sbi I added an answer with your variadic template suggestion. –  bames53 Feb 27 '12 at 18:08
1  
@bames53: They surely aren't mine! But I upvoted yours anyway. :) –  sbi Feb 27 '12 at 18:10

To show sbi's suggested variadic template solution:

namespace MyNamespace {

  template<typename...> FunctionObject;

  template<class TRet, class TArg0>
  class FunctionObject<TRet,TArg0>
  {
      typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
      typedef typename TArg0 FirstArgumentType;
      virtual ReturnType const operator()(FirstArgumentType const &arg) const = 0;
  };

  template<class TRet>
  class FunctionObject<TRet>
  {
      typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
      virtual ReturnType const operator()() const = 0;
  };

}

Now you can add specializations in whatever order you like, without modifying the other templates (unless the number/type of template parameters conflict).

share|improve this answer
    
Yup, +1, for this is simpler than mine. If you have access to a compiler that supports it. –  sbi Feb 27 '12 at 18:11

I think you can make it work with one class template, providing default type argument for the second template parameter as:

struct null_type {};

template<class TRet, class TArg0 = null_type>
class FunctionObject
{
    typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
    typedef typename TArg0 FirstArgumentType;

    //both functions here
    virtual ReturnType const operator()() const = 0;

    virtual ReturnType const operator()(FirstArgumentType const &arg) const = 0;
};
share|improve this answer
3  
Kind of in the right direction but not quite there. This will allow uses of the template with one or two arguments, but in the original question the definition of the two templates seem to be quite different (different members, different signature for operator()) which seems to indicate that specialization would be the way to go. Compared with sbi's answer, this one has the nice feature of creating a unique type (null_type should be unique) and thus allow the use of void as second argument of the two argument specialization, which is nice (+1 for that) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 27 '12 at 18:09
    
@David: That's indeed a severe shortcoming of my idea. I should fix that. –  sbi Feb 27 '12 at 18:13
    
Certainly a clever solution. Only one thing to consider with this approach is that every class inheriting this class/struct will have to implement all empty/inapplicable operators. So it's a trade off between elegant (less verbose) solution vs. less burden on future implmentation. –  user460762 Feb 27 '12 at 19:02
    
@user460762: No. Every class need not to implement inapplicable operators if you make them non-pure by adding a default empty implementation in the base itself. –  Nawaz Feb 27 '12 at 19:19
1  
I have to agree with @user460762, this is not elegant in the sense that the compiler will not be able to help you if you make mistakes like creating a FunctionObject<int> fo and call fo( null_type() ), or conversely create FunctionObject<int,int> fo and call fo() which in the C# version (from which the idea was born) would be a compile time error. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 27 '12 at 23:27

I believe that something like this will also work, but having separate classes may not be what you are looking for:

   namespace MyNamespace
   {

      class AbstractFunctionObject
      {
         //shared functionality here
      };

      template<class TRet>
      class ConcreteFunctionObjectA : AbstractFunctionObject
      {
         typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
         virtual ReturnType const operator()() const = 0;
      };


      template<class TRet, class TArg0>
      class ConcreteFunctionObjectB : AbstractFunctionObject
      {
         typedef typename TRet ReturnType;
         typedef typename TArg0 FirstArgumentType;
         virtual ReturnType const operator()(FirstArgumentType const &arg) const = 0;
      };

   }
share|improve this answer
    
While this seems indeed possible, it's also useless. What good for is an empty polymorphic base class? –  sbi Feb 27 '12 at 17:53
    
It wouldn't be empty. If the OP chose this path I image he would move the functionality that would be shared by all of the variadic templates to the base class. It is hard to guess intentions, so I left it blank. –  Hunter McMillen Feb 27 '12 at 17:55
    
What could there be in a Functor, but operator()() plus a few typedefs? –  sbi Feb 27 '12 at 18:05

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