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I have data in Python on a tuple of tuples. For example:

STATES = (
    (0, 'NO RUN ALLOWED'),
    (1, 'STOPPED'),
    (2, 'READY FOR RESTART'),
    (3, 'END NEXT GAME'),
    (4, 'RUNNING'),
)

I understand that the tuple access in Python is O(1) and I want to obtain something like this in C#. I already think in a Dictionary but i also think that it might be harmful in performance terms. Any idea?

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5 Answers 5

If you are concerned about application states, it is better to use an enum for this purpose.

public enum States
{
    NotSet, // Good design to consider 0 as an error condition!
    NoRunAllowed,
    Stopped,
    ReadyForRestart,
    EndNextGame,
    Running
}

As the enum, by default, initializes to 0, it is suggested that this be considered an invalid state. Also, Enum.HasFlag always returns true when the value to test is 0 when the Enum is used for flags (see the FlagsAttribute).

It is also common to use the DescriptionAttribute to apply a human-readable name to the individual enum options for display in a UI.

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I like the strong-typing. You may also want a 'global' collection of States so you don't keep calling Enum.GetNames() / GetValues(). You can also set int values for each enum choice. –  foson Feb 27 '12 at 18:21

What about a simple string array?

var states = new[]
{
    "NO RUN ALLOWED",
    "STOPPED",
    "READY FOR RESTART",
    "END NEXT GAME",
    "RUNNING"
};
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A string array isn't good for me cause i want to support the case in that the keys aren't "int". Another example could be: –  JavierElBene Feb 27 '12 at 18:53
1  
@user1216697 Those kind of requirements should be in the original question. –  asawyer Feb 27 '12 at 19:00
    
Oh, well! So it goes... –  Will Feb 27 '12 at 19:33

Dictionary sounds like it would work just fine, nothing to worry about speed wise either:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xfhwa508.aspx

The Dictionary generic class provides a mapping from a set of keys to a set of values. Each addition to the dictionary consists of a value and its associated key. Retrieving a value by using its key is very fast, close to O(1), because the Dictionary class is implemented as a hash table

public enum GameStates
{
    UnknownState = 0,
    NoRunningAllowed,
    Stopped,
    ReadyForRestart,
    EndNextGame,
    Running
}
///...other stuff...
var GameStateList = new Dictionary<GameStates,string>();
GameStateList.Add(GameStates.NoRunningAllowed,"NO RUN ALLOWED");
GameStateList.Add(GameStates.Stopped,"STOPPED");
GameStateList.Add(GameStates.ReadyForRestart,"READY FOR RESTART");
GameStateList.Add(GameStates.EndNextGame,"END NEXT GAME");
GameStateList.Add(GameStates.Running,"RUNNING");

string debugMessageForCurrentState = GateStateList[MyCurrentGameState];
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Tuple access by index may be O(1), but searching through a collection or a tuple for a value will not be O(1) (unless you already know the index). In your example, if in future versions, you delete State 2, every consumer may need redesign. Dictionary allows you to search through a collection for a key at O(1).

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From the documentation (emphasis mine):

The Dictionary(Of TKey, TValue) generic class provides a mapping from a set of keys to a set of values. Each addition to the dictionary consists of a value and its associated key. Retrieving a value by using its key is very fast, close to O(1), because the Dictionary(Of TKey, TValue) class is implemented as a hash table.

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