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I've run ildasm to find that this:

    using(Simple simp = new Simple())
    {
        Console.WriteLine("here");
    }

generates IL code that is equivalent to this:

    Simple simp = new Simple();
    try
    {
        Console.WriteLine("here");
    }
    finally
    {
        if(simp != null)
        {
            simp.Dispose();
        }
    }

and the question is why the hell does it check null in the finally? The finally block will only be executed if the try block is executed, and the try block will only be executed if the Simple constructor succeeds (I.e. does not throw an exception), in which case simp will be non-null. (If there is some fear that some intervening steps might come between the Simple constructor and the beginning of the try block, then that would really be a problem because then an exception might be thrown that would prevent the finally block from executing at all.) So, why the hell?

Putting aside (please) the argument of whether the using statement is better than try-finally, I write my try-finally blocks as:

    Simple simp = new Simple();
    try
    {
        Console.WriteLine("here");
    }
    finally
    {
        simp.Dispose();
        simp = null;        // sanity-check in case I touch simp again
                            // because I don't rely on all classes
                            // necessarily throwing
                            // ObjectDisposedException
    }
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I got curious about one thing: how "expensive" is that extra sanity check (simp = null) in comparison to the compiler-generated sanity check, in terms of performance? In the end the difference between those two seem more philosophical than practical, but I may be mistaken. Interesting discussion either way. –  Fredrik Mörk Jun 3 '09 at 21:04
    
@Fredrik - So you're asking whether "set to null" is faster/slower than "compare to null"? I'm not sure. Aside from that, one benefit of the using statement is you don't have to worry about that object being accessed outside of the using scope. (Unless you hold another reference to it.) –  dss539 Jun 3 '09 at 21:35
20  
"why the hell does it check null in the finally?" No good reason. Skipping the null check is an optimization which we could have performed. We didn't. Not really a big deal; null checks are short and cheap. –  Eric Lippert Jun 3 '09 at 22:59
5  
Incidentally, there are a number of places where the C# compiler DOES perform micro-optimizations like this if an expression is known to be non-null because it is the result of a new expression. This just is one that we missed. –  Eric Lippert Jun 3 '09 at 23:04
4  
I briefly discuss this optimization here: blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/06/11/… –  Eric Lippert Jun 11 '09 at 15:18

4 Answers 4

No, the finally block will ALWAYS be executed. You may not be getting the object from a new but from some other function that returns your object - and it might return NULL. using() is your friend!

dss539 was kind enough to suggest I include his note:

using(Simple simp = null)

is yet another reason that the expansion must check for null first.

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2  
Just to expand a little bit, you could be using the Factory Pattern and doing something like using (myFactory.CreateMyObject()) which could result in a null object. –  Max Schmeling Jun 3 '09 at 20:31
7  
If the constructor fails (before the try) though, the finally will not be executed. –  Zifre Jun 3 '09 at 20:31
8  
The assumption is that the 'new' will throw an exception if it fails, thus never returning a Null. If it throws the exception, the try block isn't even reached and the finally block does not get executed. So, the finally block is not ALWAYS executed. –  spoulson Jun 3 '09 at 20:35
    
@spoulson & @Zifre: You are right - try {} has to at least execute. But using() is designed for the general case. It might not be a new operator - as Max points out it might be a factory or some other method that could return null. if it fails, no try {}. If it succeeds or returns null, try will be executed. –  n8wrl Jun 3 '09 at 20:39
2  
@n8 - you should edit my answer into yours so that the OP can accept yours as a complete answer. –  dss539 Jun 3 '09 at 21:30

using(Simple simp = null) is yet another reason that the expansion must check for null first.

share|improve this answer
2  
It's only guaranteed to be a runtime error if you use the simp object. Granted there's no reason for the using if you don't.... –  Max Schmeling Jun 3 '09 at 20:37
1  
And while it is unlikely you would code = null explictly, it could be = SomeFactoryMethod() which could return null. –  n8wrl Jun 3 '09 at 20:41
2  
using (Simple simp = null) { if (someCondition) simp = new Simple(1); else if (otherCondition) simp = new Simple(2); ... } would dispose of simp in any case it exists. –  configurator Jun 3 '09 at 20:52
2  
@configurator - true but that's still a bit... dangerous. simp = new Simple(); and then another simp = new Simple(); and it would only dispose one of them –  dss539 Jun 3 '09 at 20:54
2  
...and it does not compile: error CS1656: Cannot assign to 'simp' because it is a 'using variable' –  Fredrik Mörk Jun 3 '09 at 20:57

MSDN on the using statement.

What I think is strange is that it doesn't expand to:

Simple simp = new Simple();
Simple __compilergeneratedtmpname = simp;
try
{
    Console.WriteLine("here");
}
finally
{
    if(__compilergeneratedtmpname != null)
    {
        __compilergeneratedtmpname.Dispose();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You would like to be able to change the simp variable within the using block?? –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Jun 4 '09 at 1:30
    
I didn't realize that the compiler enforces simp as effectively readonly. –  Dolphin Jun 5 '09 at 14:06
3  
Dolphin: That would cause problems when multithreading. When the constructor is immediately followed by the try, the CLR guarantees that no thread would 'interrupt' in the middle. Your way, there is no guarantee. –  configurator Jun 5 '09 at 17:49
    
@configurator: Didn't realize that! –  Jimmy Jun 11 '09 at 22:15

It appears that your comment:

"If there is some fear that some intervening steps might come between the Simple constructor and the beginning of the try block, then that would really be a problem because then an exception might be thrown that would prevent the finally block from executing at all."

is possibly dead on. See:

Atomicity & Asynchronous Exception Failures

I also want to note the issue(s) with WCF and using:

Avoiding Problems with the Using Statement and WCF Service Proxies which references:

Avoiding Problems with the Using Statement

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