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I am newbie to SOA though I have some experience in OOAD.

One of the guidelines for SOA design is “Use Abstract Classes for Modeling only. Omit them from Design”. The use of abstraction can be helpful in modeling (analysis phase).

During analysis phase I have come up with a BankAccount base class. The specialized classes derived from it are “FixedAccount” and “SavingsAccount”. I need to create a service that will return all accounts (list of accounts) for a user. What should be the structure of service(s) to meet the requirement?

Note: It would be great if you can provide code demonstration using WCF.

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If this is homework, please tag it as such. –  Henk Holterman Feb 28 '12 at 9:49
    
@HenkHolterman Its not a homework. I am allocated into a new project which uses SOA. Though I have used WCF previously, it was not using SOA. I am trying to learn SOA concepts. –  Lijo Feb 28 '12 at 10:14
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It sounds like you are trying to use SOA to remotely access your object model. You would be better of looking at the interactions and capabilities you want your service to expose and avoid exposing inheritance details of your services implementation.

So in this instance where you need a list of user accounts your interface would look something like

[ServiceContract]
interface ISomeService
{
    [OperationContract]
    Collection<AccountSummary> ListAccountsForUser(
        User user /*This information could be out of band in a claim*/);
}

[DataContract]
class AccountSummary
{
     [DataMember]
     public string AccountNumber {get;set;}
     [DataMember]
     public string AccountType {get;set;}
     //Other account summary information
}

if you do decide to go down the inheritance route, you can use the KnownType attribute, but be aware that this will add some type information into the message being sent across the wire which may limit your interoperability in some cases.

Update:

I was a bit limited for time earlier when I answered, so I'll try and elaborate on why I prefer this style.

I would not advise exposing your OOAD via DTOs in a seperate layer this usually leads to a bloated interface where you pass around a lot of data that isn't used and religously map it into and out of what is essentially a copy of your domain model with all the logic deleted, and I just don't see the value. I usually design my service layer around the operations that it exposes and I use DTOs for the definition of the service interactions.

Using DTOs based on exposed operations and not on the domain model helps keep the service encapsulation and reduces coupling to the domain model. By not exposing my domain model, I don't have to make any compromises on field visibility or inheritance for the sake of serialization.

for example if I was exposing a Transfer method from one account to another the service interface would look something like this:

[ServiceContract]
interface ISomeService
{
    [OperationContract]
    TransferResult Transfer(TransferRequest request);
}

[DataContract]
class TransferRequest
{
     [DataMember]
     public string FromAccountNumber {get;set;}
     [DataMember]
     public string ToAccountNumber {get;set;}
     [DataMember]
     public Money Amount {get;set;}
}

class SomeService : ISomeService
{
    TransferResult Transfer(TransferRequest request)
    {
        //Check parameters...omitted for clarity
        var from = repository.Load<Account>(request.FromAccountNumber);
        //Assert that the caller is authorised to request transfer on this account
        var to = repository.Load<Account>(request.ToAccountNumber);
        from.Transfer(to, request.Amount);
        //Build an appropriate response (or fault)
    }
}

now from this interface it is very clear to the conusmer what the required data to call this operation is. If I implemented this as

[ServiceContract]
interface ISomeService
{
    [OperationContract]
    TransferResult Transfer(AccountDto from, AccountDto to, MoneyDto dto);
}

and AccountDto is a copy of the fields in account, as a consumer, which fields should I populate? All of them? If a new property is added to support a new operation, all users of all operations can now see this property. WCF allows me to mark this property as non mandatory so that I don't break all of my other clients, but if it is mandatory to the new operation the client will only find out when they call the operation.

Worse, as the service implementer, what happens if they have provided me with a current balance? should I trust it?

The general rule here is to ask who owns the data, the client or the service? If the client owns it, then it can pass it to the service and after doing some basic checks, the service can use it. If the service owns it, the client should only pass enough information for the service to retrieve what it needs. This allows the service to maintain the consistency of the data that it owns.

In this example, the service owns the account information and the key to locate it is an account number. While the service may validate the amount (is positive, supported currency etc.) this is owned by the client and therefore we expect all fields on the DTO to be populated.

In summary, I have seen it done all 3 ways, but designing DTOs around specific operations has been by far the most successful both from service and consumer implementations. It allows operations to evolve independently and is very explicit about what is expected by the service and what will be returned to the client.

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1  
I agree with the concept of exposing DTOs (Data Transfer Objects) rather than your internal domain model. This means that the DTO can be concerned with the response you are sending via the service and the domain object is concerned with representing the business entity. –  Steve Fenton Feb 28 '12 at 9:52
    
@Sohnee Thanks. Suppose I have a OOAD based design, do we need to convert it into DTO (as suggested above) using a separate layer before consuming in service? Is that a good practice? Do we have any good articles explaining PROS and CONS of this approach? –  Lijo Feb 28 '12 at 10:19
    
@jageall. Thanks for the clear explanation. Three questions - 1) Does AutoMapper produce "Operation specific DTO" or "DTO from domain wihtout behavior"? 2) What are the tools that you use for the "Operation specific DTO" approach? 3) Do we have any article/tutorial that explains the use of generic repository.Load<Account> ? –  Lijo Feb 29 '12 at 5:16
1  
I don't personally use automapper (AM) anymore, but it can do both. It encourages DTO from domain because it copies based on field names. If you have it verify it's maps, you have to explicitly tell it what you don't want mapped which can be more work than mapping by hand (this is why I don't use it anymore). I find this style of interface reduces incoming mapping to a level I can do by hand. For outgoing DTOs you may find AM useful, but I still do them by hand as they are often very flattened wrt the domain to make the interface better. For repository: goo.gl/0fGXX –  jageall Feb 29 '12 at 7:06
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I think the best practice here is to not use inheritance in your data-contracts:

[DataContract]
class SavingsAccount
{
   public string AccountNr { ... }
   ....
}

[DataContract]
class FixedAccount
{
   public string AccountNr { ... }
   ....
}

Which works wel for most scenarios but not for getting a list of mixed accounts.
If that is really essential, consider:

[DataContract]
class AccountDTO
{
   public string AccountType { ... }
   public string AccountNr   { ... }
   ....
}

which is essentially @jageall's answer.

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Thanks. Do you think, a service that returns a MIXED result a NOT SO GOOD idea? What is the usual standard practice here? –  Lijo Feb 28 '12 at 10:17
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I would go pretty much with what others have said here, but probably needs to add these:

  • Most SOA systems use Web Services for communication. Web Services expose their interface via WSDL. WSDL does not have any understanding of inheritance.
  • All behaviour in your DTOs will be lost when they cross the wire
  • All private/protected fields will be lost when they cross the wire

Imagine this scenario (case is silly but illustrative):

public abstract class BankAccount
{
    private DateTime _creationDate = DateTime.Now;

    public DateTime CreationDate
    {
        get { return _creationDate; }
        set { _creationDate = value; }
    }

    public virtual string CreationDateUniversal
    {
        get { return _creationDate.ToUniversalTime().ToString(); }
    }
}

public class SavingAccount : BankAccount
{
    public override string CreationDateUniversal
    {
        get
        {
            return base.CreationDateUniversal + " UTC";
        }
    }
}

And now you have used "Add Service Reference" or "Add Web Reference" on your client (and not re-use of the assemblies) to access the the saving account.

SavingAccount account = serviceProxy.GetSavingAccountById(id);
account.CreationDate = DateTime.Now;
var creationDateUniversal = account.CreationDateUniversal; // out of sync!!

What is going to happen is the changes to the CreationDate will not be reciprocated to the CreationDateUniversal since there is no implementation crossed the wire, only the value of CreationDateUniversal at the time of serialization at the server.

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Thanks. Could you please elaborate the example little more? What do you mean by "changes to the CreationDate will not be reciprocated". Does it mean that I changed the logic in base class? –  Lijo Feb 28 '12 at 11:02
1  
@Lijo means that when on the server I change CreationDate, value of the CreationDateUniversal also changes, since it uses protected field to calculate the value. But on the client, these values have come as simple auto property so if you change CreationDate then CreationDateUniversal it will not be changed. –  Aliostad Feb 28 '12 at 11:07
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