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I have a WCF client that sends request to WCF service. Both client and server runs locally. The request consists of a DateTime type value, the value has a value (e.g. DateTime.Now). WCF client proxy sends the request. However, all values of DateTime type disappear when I use fiddler to capture the request before the request is sent to the server.

Update:

I tried both DataContractSerializer and XmlSerializer to serializer WCF class manually (shown below), the result is that XmlSerializer omitted the DateTime value (ie, the DateTime value disappears), DataContractSerializer keeps the value.

Because the WCF server is using XmlSerializer, and because the amount of client proxy classes, ideally, the client should use XmlSerializer.

WCF client:

WCF Proxy class:

[System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("System.Xml", "4.0.30319.225")]
[System.SerializableAttribute()]
//[System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThroughAttribute()]
[System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategoryAttribute("code")]
[System.Xml.Serialization.XmlTypeAttribute(Namespace="urn:core_e-nbp-v1.0")]
public partial class ClaimApplication : object, System.ComponentModel.INotifyPropertyChanged {

private System.DateTime hBEffectiveDateField;


            /// <remarks/>
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(DataType = "date", Order = 3)]
    public System.DateTime HBEffectiveDate {
        get {
            return this.hBEffectiveDateField;
        }
        set {
            this.hBEffectiveDateField = value;
            this.RaisePropertyChanged("HBEffectiveDate");
        }
    }

}                               




//Assign a random DateTime value
             claimApplication.HBEffectiveDate = DateTime.Now.ToUniversalTime();

//manully serialize to check the DateTime using XmlSerializer
            XmlSerializer s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(ClaimApplication));
            StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(@"D:\xmlsamples\XmlSerializer.xml");
            s.Serialize(sw,claimApplication);


            sw.Dispose();


//manully serialize to check the DateTime using DataContractSerializer
                DataContractSerializer dc  = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(ClaimApplication));
                FileStream fs = new FileStream(@"D:\xmlsamples\DataContractSerializer.xml", FileMode.CreateNew);
                dc.WriteObject(fs,claimApplication);
                fs.Dispose();

WCF server:

 [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(DataType = "date")]
    public System.DateTime EffectiveDate
    {
        get { return this.EffectiveDateField; }
        set { this.EffectiveDateField = value; }
    }

Any idea?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I am unable to reproduce the issue using the code that you have provided:

[TestFixture]
public class When_Scenario
{
    [System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCodeAttribute("System.Xml", "4.0.30319.225")]
    [System.SerializableAttribute()]
    //[System.Diagnostics.DebuggerStepThroughAttribute()]
    [System.ComponentModel.DesignerCategoryAttribute("code")]
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlTypeAttribute(Namespace = "urn:core_e-nbp-v1.0")]
    public partial class ClaimApplication : object, System.ComponentModel.INotifyPropertyChanged
    {

        private System.DateTime hBEffectiveDateField;


        /// <remarks/>
        [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(DataType = "date", Order = 3)]
        public System.DateTime HBEffectiveDate
        {
            get
            {
                return this.hBEffectiveDateField;
            }
            set
            {
                this.hBEffectiveDateField = value;
            }
        }

        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    } 

    [Test]
    public void Should_Assertion()
    {
        ClaimApplication claimApplication = new ClaimApplication();
        claimApplication.HBEffectiveDate = DateTime.Now.ToUniversalTime();


        XmlSerializer s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(ClaimApplication));

        s.Serialize(Console.Out, claimApplication);
    }
}

Because you are using XmlSerialization you do not have to decorate the members that you are serializing unless you want to serialize a complex type, change the namespace or the name of property to be used in the Xml. I can see that there is some generated code but it is not clear what has generated it and why. The only thing I can spot is that there is a name difference between the entity on the server side and the client side. In order for that to work you would need to override the name on either the client or the server side in the XmlElementAttribute.

That aside you have said you have chosen to use the XmlSerializer over the DataContractSerializer but it is not clear why. The DataContractSerializer is used by default out of the box and is more performent than the XmlSerializer. If you are only going between two .net applications you could also look at the NetDataContractSerializer. Dan Rigsby has a good comparison of the three serializers mentioned.

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I solved this problem so:

...

    /// <remarks/>
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElementAttribute(DataType = "date", Order = 1)]
    public System.DateTime BirthDate
    {
        get
        {
            return this.birthDateField;
        }
        set
        {
            this.birthDateField = value;
            this.RaisePropertyChanged("BirthDate");
        }
    }

    /// <remarks/>
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlIgnoreAttribute()]
    public bool BirthDateSpecified {
        get {
            return this.birthDateFieldSpecified;
        }
        set {
            this.birthDateFieldSpecified = value;
            this.RaisePropertyChanged("BirthDateSpecified");
        }
    }

...

and

contact.BirthDate = DateTime.Now;
contact.BirthDateSpecified = true; //<-- See here
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