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I have a csv file, and I would like to sort it by column priority, like "order by". For example:

3;1;2
1;3;2
1;2;3
2;3;1
2;1;3
3;2;1

If this situation was the result of a "select", the "order by" would be as follows: order by column2, column1, column3 - the result would be:

2;1;3
3;1;2
1;2;3
3;2;1
1;3;2
2;3;1

I'd like to know how to get this same result using "sort" command on Unix.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted
sort --field-separator=';' --key=2,1,3
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1  
Great @CharlieMartin, works fine! Thank you very much! –  Rafael Orágio Feb 27 '12 at 19:51
1  
Happy to help. hit the check mark? –  Charlie Martin Feb 27 '12 at 20:12
    
@Charlie Martin:this would not work for csvs that contain ";" within the cell, right? –  user121196 May 12 '13 at 6:50
    
Right. You could work out something trating the land and right hand sides of those as separate fields. If that doesn't work, look at using tr to turn the semicolons into tabs and maybe use column numbers. –  Charlie Martin May 13 '13 at 16:18
    
If the values are numeric, then you probably want consider using the -n option which will "compare according to string numerical value" or the -g option which will "compare according to general numerical value". A string comparison of numeric values will get the numbers ordered like 1,10,2,20. At least those are options available on my version of sort on CentOS. You should verify with the man page what the correct options are on your version of sort. –  Adam Porad Jun 14 '13 at 15:22

Charlie's answer above didn't work for me on Cygwin (sort version 2.0, GNU textutils), the following did:

sort -t"," -k2 -k1 -k1
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2  
Cygwin has an older version of sort. As always, the man page is your friend. –  Charlie Martin Feb 20 '13 at 20:44
    
I agree with @CharlieMartin, you should check the man page on your system. On CentOS I used sort --field-separator=';' -k2 -k1 -k3 test.csv –  Adam Porad Jun 14 '13 at 15:20

Suppose you have another row 3;10;3 in your unsorted.csv file. Then I guess you expect a numerically sorted result:

2;1;3
3;1;2
1;2;3
3;2;1
1;3;2
2;3;1
3;10;3

and not an alphabetically sorted one:

2;1;3
3;1;2
3;10;3
1;2;3
3;2;1
1;3;2
2;3;1

To get that, you have to use -n:

sort --field-separator=';' -n -k 2,2 -k 1,1 -k 3,3 unsorted.csv

It is worth mentioning that 2,2 has to be used. If only 2 is used, then sort takes the string from beginning of field 2 to the end. 2,2 makes sure that only field 2 is used.

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