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Given this table:

CREATE TABLE aTable (aCol TEXT UNIQUE, ...);
INSERT INTO aTable VALUES ( 'one', ... );

I need to duplicate rowid 1 and then change it

BEGIN;
INSERT INTO aTable SELECT * FROM aTable WHERE rowid = 1;
UPDATE aTable SET aCol = 'new unique value' WHERE rowid = 1;
COMMIT;

But that violates the UNIQUE constraint.

How can I retrieve the pre-transaction state of rowid 1?

Of course I could do a SELECT before the transaction, and bind its results to a prepared INSERT statement. I'm also aware of the following, but are there are other methods?

CREATE TEMP TABLE aTemp AS SELECT * FROM aTable WHERE rowid = 1;
...
DROP TABLE aTemp;

Updated
More context: aTable is a history table with normal order, later rows are later versions. However one row (rowid 1) is in progress and therefore not in the history. Thus rowid 1 must be updated to have the latest unique value.

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1 Answer

I'm not sure if I'm missing something obvious, but couldn't you simply do something like:

INSERT INTO table (col1, col2, col3)
    SELECT col1, 'New value', col3 FROM other_table WHERE col1 = 1

...which would duplicate the row apart from col2. What you've not mentioned is where the new unique value will come from, so a bit of guidance around that be helpful.

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I need the new unique value to land in rowid 1, and the existing value to land in the new row. –  Liam Feb 27 '12 at 20:47
    
If the new row is a duplicate of the original row, does it matter which row gets the new value? –  Chris J Feb 27 '12 at 20:54
    
Yes. In this app, rowid 1 has a special role, where it always has the latest unique value. –  Liam Feb 27 '12 at 21:45
1  
"In this app, rowid 1 has a special role . . ." No good can come from that. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Feb 27 '12 at 22:07
    
It almost sounds like you're creating a history table, but in reverse (i.e., later row IDs have older history). Is this the case? If so, then you're better off turning it on it's head so rowid effectively becomes a version number. –  Chris J Feb 27 '12 at 22:23
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