Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I can't use callbacks because I have a scenario like this (pseudo-code):

$('.box').on('click', function() {
    $('.expanded-box').animate({
        // shrink it
    });

    $(this).animate({
        // grow it
        $(this).addClass('expanded-box');
    });
});

I can't put the expansion animation within the callback for the expanded-box growth animation because it may not always happen. But I need the second animation to wait till the previous one is done. How can I do this?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by "it may not always happen."? Do you mean that .expanded-box may not exist? –  James Montagne Feb 27 '12 at 21:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Since jQuery 1.6, you can use promise() to obtain a Promise object that will be resolved when all animations on a given element have completed. In addition, the documentation says:

Using .promise() on a collection with no active animation returns a resolved Promise.

Therefore, it's well-suited to your use case, and you can write:

$('.box').on('click', function() {
    var $this = $(this);
    $('.expanded-box').animate({
        // shrink it
    }).promise().done(function() {
        $this.animate({
            // grow it
        }).addClass('expanded-box');
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Cool, didn't even know about promise() - thanks! It works on a lot of different methods, too. –  CaptSaltyJack Feb 27 '12 at 21:28
    
How is this different to putting the second part in the complete callback of the first animation? –  nnnnnn Feb 27 '12 at 22:48
1  
@nnnnnn, if $(".expanded-box") doesn't match anything, the complete callback will not be called, as it is called once for each matched element. On the other hand, promise() returns a resolved Promise object if called on an empty jQuery object, therefore making sure the function passed to done() is called in all cases (i.e. even on the first click, when no box is expanded yet). –  Frédéric Hamidi Feb 27 '12 at 22:59
    
Cool, thanks. +1. –  nnnnnn Feb 27 '12 at 23:30
    
This is the cleanest approach I've seen. Thanks!! –  Mike May 31 '12 at 16:37

You can encapsulate the second animation's code in a function and then call that function from the callback of the first animation or call it if the first animation doesn't happen. Assuming the idea is to shrink some other control that had the "expanded-box" class from a previous click:

$('.box').on('click', function() {
    var $this = $(this),
        $exp = $(".expanded-box");

    function grow() {
       $this.animate({
           width: "200px", height: "100px"
       }).addClass('expanded-box');
    }

    if ($exp.length > 0) {
       $exp.animate({
           width: "100px", height: "50px"
       }, grow).removeClass("expanded-box");
    } else {
       grow();
    }        
});​

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/PXddm/

share|improve this answer
    
Cool. I had thought of this, but was hoping for a more elegant solution. I thought there was some sort of animation queue feature in jQuery. –  CaptSaltyJack Feb 27 '12 at 21:10
    
There is definitely an animnation queue feature. It used to apply only per element, but "As of jQuery 1.7, the queue option can also accept a string, in which case the animation is added to the queue represented by that string." - but I've never used that feature so I'm not sure exactly how it works. –  nnnnnn Feb 27 '12 at 22:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.