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I am currently saving a message to a single file from multiple activity classes within my app. Each activity class has the same function WriteToFile.

public void WriteToFile(String info) {

    FileOutputStream FoutS = null;
    OutputStreamWriter outSW = null;

    try {

        FoutS = openFileOutput("file.txt", MODE_PRIVATE);
        outSW = new OutputStreamWriter(FoutS);
        outSW.write(info);
        outSW.flush();
    }

    catch (Exception e) {
    }

    finally {
        try {
            outSW.close();
            FoutS.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
        }
    }
}

I have been attempting to create a separate class which holds this function write (and read) to file but I haven't been able to without getting errors.

I think the function needs to have context passed through to the WriteToFile void like...

    //Changes to this line
 public void WriteToFile(String info, Context context) {

    FileOutputStream FoutS = null;
    OutputStreamWriter outSW = null;

    try {
                      //Changes to this line
        FoutS = context.openFileOutput("file.txt", MODE_PRIVATE);
        outSW = new OutputStreamWriter(FoutS);
        outSW.write(info);
        outSW.flush();
    }

    catch (Exception e) {
    }

    finally {
        try {
            outSW.close();
            FoutS.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
        }
    }
}

if that is correct am I passing the context correctly?

String msg = "This is a message";

WriteToFile(msg, this);

It's not working so I am doing something wrong.

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If you could post the stack trace you are seeing that would help (you might want to remove your catch statement to ensure the exception gets thrown up the stack). –  tomtheguvnor Feb 27 '12 at 21:14
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should use your context to call the method

 context.openFileOutput("file.txt", context.MODE_PRIVATE);

what you wrote has no meaning, or far from what you mean.

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