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 // Queue.java
 // demonstrates queue
 // to run this program: C>java QueueApp

 class Queue
 {
private int maxSize;
private long[] queArray;
private int front;
private int rear;
private int nItems;

public Queue(int s)          // constructor
  {
  maxSize = s;
  queArray = new long[maxSize];
  front = 0;
  rear = -1;
  nItems = 0;
  }

public void insert(long j)   
  {
  if(rear == maxSize-1)         
     rear = -1;
  queArray[++rear] = j;        
  nItems++;                    
  }


public long remove()         
  {
  long temp = queArray[front++];
  if(front == maxSize)           
     front = 0;
  nItems--;                     
  return temp;
  }

 public long peekFront()     
  {
  return queArray[front];
  }

 public boolean isEmpty()    // true if queue is empty
  {
  return (nItems==0);
  }

public boolean isFull()     // true if queue is full
  {
  return (nItems==maxSize);
  }

public int size()           // number of items in queue
  {
  return nItems;
  }


public void display()
{ int startFront = front;

  for (int j = front ;j <nItems; j++ )
  {  
      System.out.println(queArray[j]);
      if (j == nItems-1 )
        {       j=0;
                System.out.println(queArray[j]);
        }   


      if (j==startFront-1)
          return;

       }
          }
         }  

 class QueueApp
  {
        public static void main(String[] args)
  {
  Queue theQueue = new Queue(5);  // queue holds 5 items

  theQueue.insert(10);            // insert 4 items
  theQueue.insert(20);
  theQueue.insert(30);
  theQueue.insert(40);

  theQueue.remove();              // remove 3 items
  theQueue.remove();              //    (10, 20, 30)
  theQueue.remove();

  theQueue.insert(50);            // insert 4 more items
  theQueue.insert(60);            //    (wraps around)
  theQueue.insert(70);
  theQueue.insert(80);


  theQueue.display();


  while( !theQueue.isEmpty() )    // remove and display
     {                            //    all items
    long n = theQueue.remove();  // (40, 50, 60, 70, 80)
     System.out.print(n);
     System.out.print(" ");
     }
  System.out.println("");

  }  // end main()
}  // end class QueueApp

Okay, this is the basic, out of the book, queue code. I am attempting to create a display method that will show the queue in order, from front to back. (This is an assignment, i know this is not practical....) If i run the program as is, it will display the queue in order from front to rear(at least that is what i believe i did). The problem i am having is if i change the nItems, it ceases to work. For example if you add the line of code, theQueue.remove(); right above the call to the display, the method ceases to work, i know it is because the front is now = to 4, instead of 3,and it will not enter the for method which needs the front to be < nItems, 4<4 is not true so the for loop does not initiate.

share|improve this question
    
Queue theQueue = new Queue(5); don't hardcode queue size to 5, let input decide the size. Ask for queue size using Scanner. –  Nambari Feb 27 '12 at 22:01
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Simply use something like:

public void display() {
    for (int i = 0; i < nItems; i++) {
        System.out.println(queArray[(front + i) % maxSize]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works perfectly, but i have just one question. I understand how the For loop works, it will do what is below for each item in the array. Now As i can read, Print to screen, value of front plus i, what exactly does % do in the code? This is the first time i have seen it used. –  Renuz Feb 27 '12 at 22:32
    
% is the modulo operator, a.k.a. the remainder. Suppose i increments indefinitely, values of i % 5 will be 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 0, 1, 2, etc. –  Florent Guillaume Feb 27 '12 at 22:37
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In my opinion you're using too many variables which you don't need. You only need the Queue size and its item count.

public Queue(int s) {

    size = s;
    queArray = new long[s];
    nItems = 0;

}

public void insert(long j) {

    if(nItems < size) {
        queArray[nItems] = j;
        nItems++;
    }                    
}

public long remove() {
  if(nItems > 0) {
    long temp = queArray[nItems];
    nItems--;                     
   return temp;
  }
}

public void display() {

  for(int j = 0; j < nItems; j++) {
    System.out.println(queArray[j]);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

So what's happening right now is that j is the position of the element in your array, which is different from the number of elements that you've printed so far.

You need to either use a different index to count how many elements you printed or check whether you're at the end by comparing j to rear.

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When the queue is full (rear == maxSize - 1) and you do a insert, it will replace the first item, so i think the line nItems++ should not be incremented when the queue is already full.

Edit: Avoid modulus operations when you don't need them, they consume a lot of cpu.

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The backing store for your queue is :

private long[] queArray;

Why don't you instead use :

private List<Long> queArray

and let List worry about the resizing effort after add/remove operations. Your current queue implementation needs to know exactly how many elements are going into the queue on construction. That's pretty inconvenient for clients using this API.

You can instantiate the queArray as :

queArray = new ArrayList<Long>();

in your constructor. Once you really understand that code, you can then move onto worrying about the re-sizing logic yourself.

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1  
Does not address the question at all. –  trutheality Feb 27 '12 at 22:06
1  
Its for an assignment, probably has to do it that way. –  Dan675 Feb 27 '12 at 22:08
    
@trutheality, I disagree. I'm pointing out why his current implementation does not work - and what he can do to fix it. –  Amir Afghani Feb 27 '12 at 22:10
    
@Dan, I won't go so far as to guess what he is and is not allowed to use in his assignment. –  Amir Afghani Feb 27 '12 at 22:13
1  
@AmirAfghani His current implementation (almost) works, and the resizability of the array is irrelevant: it looks like a textbook circular array implementation of a queue with an upper capacity bound. Replacing it with a List will not change anything. –  trutheality Feb 27 '12 at 22:19
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