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How to insert newline character after comma in ),( with sed?

$ more temp.txt
(foo),(bar)
(foobar),(foofoobar)

$ sed 's/),(/),\n(/g' temp.txt 
(foo),n(bar)
(foobar),n(foofoobar)

Why this doesn't work?

share|improve this question
2  
What platform and version of sed are you using? – potong Feb 27 '12 at 23:12

sed does not support the \n escape sequence in its substitution command, however, it does support a real newline character if you escape it (because sed commands should only use a single line, and the escape is here to tell sed that you really want a newline character):

$ sed 's/),(/),\\
(/g' temp.txt
(foo),
(bar)
(foobar),
(foofoobar)

You can also use a shell variable to store the newline character.

$ NL='
'
$ sed "s/),(/,\\$NL(/g" temp.txt
(foo),
(bar)
(foobar),
(foofoobar)

Tested on Mac OS X Lion, using bash as shell.

share|improve this answer
    
In the first approach, why it needs to be \` but not `? – qazwsx Feb 27 '12 at 22:41
    
The command you pass to sed are not supposed to contains newline. So if you want to pass a newline, you need to escape it with a backslash so that sed know you did on purpose. And you need a second backslash to protect the first from being interpreted by the shell (using backslash to escape character in regexp was IMHO a bad idea since it is also generally used to quote character in string, and thus you usually have to use double backslash in regexp). – Sylvain Defresne Feb 28 '12 at 9:29

You just have to escape with a backslash character and press the enter key while typing:

$ sed 's/),(/),\
(/g' temp.txt
(foo),
(bar)
(foobar),
(foofoobar)
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work if you put the sed command in a bash file. Only if you put `\` before the new line character, it starts to work. But I wonder why? – qazwsx Feb 27 '12 at 22:42
    
@user001 For what is worth, the exact same command worked for me in bash 4.2.10 in Ubuntu 11.10. – jcollado Feb 27 '12 at 23:01

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