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Im a bit confused about inherited instance variables in ABCs. I have written an example to show my confusion. Class A needs a list which class B inherits but it must be an instance object rather than a class object. However class B also needs its own instance variable local. Can anyone set me straight?

#!python
from abc import ABCMeta, abstractmethod, abstractproperty
import unittest

class A(object):

    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta
    _internal = ['initialized']

    @property
    def internal(self):
        return self._internal

    def get_a(self):
        return self._internal

    @abstractmethod
    def set_a(self, value):
        pass

class B(A):   
    def __init__(self):
       self.local = 'OK'


    def get_local(self):
        return self.local

    def set_a(self, value):
        self._internal.append(value)


class TestCase(unittest.TestCase):

    def test_implementation(self): 
        self.assertEqual(['initialized'], B().get_a() )  # this passes but for wrong reason
        b_used = B().set_a('used') 
        b_unused = B()

        print "b_used.get_a() should return ['initialized','used']"
        print "b_unused.get_a() should return ['initialized']"
        print "b_used.get_local() should equal b_unused.get_local() = 'OK'"

        self.assertEqual(['initialized'], b_unused.get_a())  # >> fails with ['initialized'] =! ['initialized', 'used']
        self.assertNotEqual(b_unused.get_a(), b_used.get_a())


if __name__ == "__main__":
    unittest.main()

The problem is that _internal is a class obj of class A. I need it to be an instance object of class B.

Thanks In advance

share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? If not, a better implementation would be to not use getter/setter methods like you have above. It's not recommended in python. – Daenyth Feb 27 '12 at 22:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should initialize instance attributes in __init__() and call the base class __init__() in B:

class A(object):
    __metaclass__ = ABCMeta
    def __init__(self):
        self._internal = ['initialized']
    ...

class B(A):   
    def __init__(self):
        A.__init__(self)
        self.local = 'OK'
    ...

You should also fix your unit test:

class TestCase(unittest.TestCase):

    def test_implementation(self): 
        self.assertEqual(['initialized'], B().get_a() )  # this passes but for wrong reason
        b_used = B()
        b_used.set_a('used') 
        b_unused = B()
        ...
share|improve this answer
    
This works perfectly. I just seen the problem in the test too. Thanks! – Peter Moore Feb 27 '12 at 22:48
    
Is there any particular reason why call A.__init__(self) and not super(B, self).__init__()? – user558061 May 23 '13 at 11:06
    
@user558061: Yes, there is. super() shouldn't be considered the standard way of calling base class constructors. It only works properly in certain settings. – Sven Marnach May 29 '13 at 21:27

Instance attributes should be defined in a method, eg __init__, by setting them on self.

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