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I'm completely new to Core Data and I was wondering about the best approach to the following task I want to do (even if I should use Core Data at all):

  • I have several entities with different 1-to-1 and 1-to-many relationships among them.

  • I want to show a "consolidated" set of information to the user in a table view

  • To get that "consolidated" info I have to do much more than simply fetching some rows. I need to get some entities, filter them according to some algorithms, calculate some information (stored in transient properties), etc.

  • Once I have the result (a reduced set of instances) I want to show it to the user

  • Because it's a heavy task I want to execute it in a separated background thread


Said that, when I have the set of selected ManagedObject ready:

  • Should I pass just their "IDs" to the main thread in order to refetch them in the main ManagedContext?. What can I do with the transient info that was calculated (to be shown along other data in table's cells).

  • Couldn't I just pass them back just to be shown?.

  • For the last question, could I "lock" the ManagedContext to ensure that the data is passed without any problem (I read that this could be an option)?

  • Is Core Data appropriated for this usage? Should I consider another approach/technology?


Thanks in advance

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
  • Should I pass just their "IDs" to the main thread in order to refetch them in the main ManagedContext?. What can I do with the transient info that was calculated (to be shown along other data in table's cells).
  • Couldn't I just pass them back just to be shown?.

there's no need of passing the ids, you can easily call a NSOperation for doing your calculation and retrieve and store your set of objects, then at the end of calculation you just need to call:

[tableView performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(reloadData) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:YES];

Which will trigger table to call again its delegate selectors. What is important is that you have to store the retrieved objects in a datasource to which the delegate selectors have access, which could be a NSArray for example:

@property(nonatomic,strong) NSArray *datasource;

-(void)loadDataAsynchronously {

    NSOperationQueue *queue = [NSOperationQueue new];
    NSInvocationOperation *operation = [[NSInvocationOperation alloc] initWithTarget:self
                                                                            selector:@selector(loadData)
                                                                              object:nil];

    [queue addOperation:operation];
}

-(void)loadData{
  // do your calculation and store into array
  self.datasource=......

  // reload on main thread
  [tableView performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(reloadData) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:YES];
}

- (UITableViewCell *)tableView:(UITableView *)table cellForRowAtIndexPath:(NSIndexPath *)indexPath {
    YourObject *obj = [[self datasource] objectAtIndex:indexPath.row];
    YourTableViewCell *cell = [tableView dequeueReusableCellWithIdentifier:@"tableCell"];
    cell.cellTitle.text=obj.titleForCell;
    cell.cellDescr.text=obj.descriptionForCell;
    return cell;
}
  • For the last question, could I "lock" the ManagedContext to ensure that the data is passed without any problem (I read that this could be an option)?

Once you have retrieved the object there's no need to lock CoreData if you have a read only table. Otherwise if you are aware of a background thread that may have change your already displayed data, and your table can be edited and saved, you have to put in place a heavy logic for dealing with that. Or you will get an "inconsistency error". But if you have a read only table, you could for example alert the controllers if someone has changed the data, and ask them to reload the table.

  • Is Core Data appropriated for this usage? Should I consider another approach/technology?

Yes it is, the only point you should take care, is what kind of calculation you are doing. The most frequent error is to think of CoreData as a SQL Database rather than a graph of object (an error I did most frequently), so many particle and accurate sql-like operations are not possible. In many cases you will end to retrieve a criteria based set, on which you have to do further in memory calculation. But honestly, despite what many says, unless you have thousand of record, I found all the iOS device to be very quick in that for a reasonable amount of data.

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Thanks for answering. <br/> I asked the first question because it's always said "Don't ever cross threads boundaries". <br/> I come from Java programming and there being "not thread safe" it's not the same as "don't pass it among threads". You just need to know what your are doing and use "synchronize" wisely. But, some info could be bound to the thread and it could be the reason. <br/> My code is in fact quite similar to yours. –  JZarzuela Mar 1 '12 at 19:34

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