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Basically I have a block of html that I want to echo to the page and the html has the $ sign in it and the php thinks it is a variable so $1 is treated as the variable not the value and is not displayed.

There is the standard answers here but none are working: PHP: How to get $ to print using echo

My next idea is to split the string at the $ and echo each part out.

Here is the code I have tried echo and print.

foreach ($rows as $rowmk) {
    $s = $rowmk->longdescription;
    //$s = str_replace('$', '@', $s);
    $s = str_replace('$', '\$', $s);
    //echo  "$s" . "<br>";
    print $s;
}

All help appreciated.

OK I solved by using the character code value for $

foreach ($rows as $rowmk) {
    $s = $rowmk->longdescription;       
    $s = str_replace('$', '&#36;', $s);
    echo  $s . "<br>";
}

I figured I should just post it anyway.

Thanks,

Mat

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1  
Your question and answer don't make sense. $dollar = '$'; echo $dollar; would work just fine. –  Matthew Feb 27 '12 at 23:15
    
If your html has a dollar sign in it, and you try to echo that string, PHP will not assume the $ sign is a variable prefix - it will just print the text out. So, I think you have another problem with your first code block. You're not using eval() in your template, are you? –  halfer Feb 27 '12 at 23:17
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're doing it in the wrong place. Variable interpolating is done when double quoted string literal (which in your case is stored within $rowmk->longdescription is daclared. Once it's done, you can't really do anything to get your $s back.

Solution, do proper escaping, when you declare the string.

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Thank you. I didn't know ... –  Mat Kay Feb 28 '12 at 1:44
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Or you could echo string literal using single quotes...

<?php

echo 'Give me $1';

?>

will print:

Give me $1

PHP string docs:

http://php.net/manual/en/language.types.string.php

Side note - the link you provide has many answers that would work perfectly. How are you applying them in a way that doesn't work?

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This doesn't really answer his problem. He already is using single quotes. He must be doing something else that he isn't showing us. –  Matthew Feb 27 '12 at 23:19
    
I don't see that he is using single quotes already, but I do see your point. Since he is echoing from $db he may not be in total control of the output in its raw state, which is why he shows us his solution. Though it would be a lot easier to encode the data on input and not on every read. Still, echoing from db should not evaluate the $. Imagine how deadly that would be. –  Kai Qing Feb 27 '12 at 23:28
    
My longdescription field is html, a table with a column in it with a dollar value in it eg: <td>$5 </td>. The $5 was being interpreted as a variable. Echoing '$s' outputted $s and not the table ... –  Mat Kay Feb 28 '12 at 1:39
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Just use a single quoted string.

$foo = 'Hello';
echo '$foo'; // $foo
echo "$foo"; // Hello
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I assume you read your rows from a database. Dollar Signs inside these strings will not be interpolated by php. Here's a little test script to try it out:

  // you'd first have to set the three variables according to your database
  $dbh = new PDO($DSN, $DB_USER, $DB_PASS);

  // create a table and insert a string containing a dollar sign
  $dbh->exec('CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS some_text ( longdescription VARCHAR( 255 ))');
  $dbh->exec('INSERT INTO some_text ( longdescription ) VALUES ( "10 $" )');

  // query all the data from the table
  $query =$dbh->query("SELECT * FROM some_text");
  $rows = $query->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_CLASS);

  // loop over all the rows (as in your example) and output the rows
  // no problem at all
  foreach ($rows as $rowmk) {
    $s = $rowmk->longdescription;
    echo  $s . "<br>";
  }
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Hi bjelli, Sadly they were being interpreted as variables. –  Mat Kay Feb 28 '12 at 1:42
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