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I have got a .txt file of student details. The student details are as follows:

Std_no: 222  
Std_name: Dani 
Std_gender: M

Std_no: 345 
Std_name: John 
Std_gender: M

What I have done is that I created a structure containing the members:

struct student
 {
   int Std_no;
   char* Std_name;
   Char* Std_gender;
 }

I have defined a linked list which points to the (Student Structure) so that I can iterate in it when retrieving back an output.

struct sstudent_elements
   {
      struct student *p
      struct student_element *next;
   }

what I am trying to achieve is to be able to read the .txt file, assign the values to the student structure members. Appreciate your help & suggestions. If there are any mistakes or problems with what I am doing, please feel free to tell me.

Regards.

share|improve this question
5  
What is the specific problem that you're facing? – Oliver Charlesworth Feb 27 '12 at 23:29
5  
What tripped you up? Opening the file for reading? Extracting the correct portions of the text? Assigning to the structs? Building the linked list? – alex Feb 27 '12 at 23:30
2  
Is this homework? If so please tag as such. – jwddixon Feb 27 '12 at 23:30
1  
@OliCharlesworth I don't know exactly how to read a file, use gets() and scanf(). – HShbib Feb 27 '12 at 23:33
1  
@alex assigning the values in the .txt file to the members of the student structure and I think this is done in the File_reading operation. – HShbib Feb 27 '12 at 23:35

This appears to be homework, you should tag it as such.

I recommend reading up on fopen -- that will help you get a FILE object to access the file, and read up on examples of how to use fscanf. Note that scanf is kind of tricky, and you may find it easier to parse lines "by hand" using fgets to get the lines and strchr or similar calls to find the field separators.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. How do I tag the post ? – HShbib Feb 27 '12 at 23:48
    
I would say strtok is much better than fscanf in this scenario, as you know that the file will be split by newlines. – Richard J. Ross III Feb 27 '12 at 23:51
    
strtok is kind of confusing for newcomers, though -- the API is non-intuitive. I tend to tell people to use strchr and manually nul out the separators... – Perry Feb 27 '12 at 23:53
    
You edit your post, and add the tag "homework" at the bottom. – Perry Feb 27 '12 at 23:53

Try this:

typedef struct
{
    int Std_no;
    char* Std_name;
    char* Std_gender;
} student;

int parseStdNo(char *line)
{
    return atoi(line + 8);
}

char *parseStdName(char *line)
{
    return line + 10;
}

char *parseStdGender(char *line)
{
    return line + 12;
}

int main()
{
    char *fileLocation = "/path/to/my/file";
    FILE *file = fopen(fileLocation, "r");

    if (!file)
    {
        printf("%s\n", strerror(errno));
    }

    // assume max file size of 1 kb, any more and you may consider malloc-ing your array
    char buffer[1024];

    // assume max of 128 students, any more and you may consider malloc-ing your array
    student students[128];

    if (fread(buffer, 1, sizeof(buffer), file))
    {
        // buffer now contains our file data
        char *line = strtok(buffer, "\n");
        int studentIndex = 0;

        students[studentIndex].Std_no = parseStdNo(line);

        // 0 is number, 1 is name, 2 is gender
        int lineType = 1;

        while ((line = strtok(NULL, "\n")))
        {
            if (lineType == 3)
            {
                studentIndex++;
                lineType = 0;
            }

            switch (lineType) {
                case 0:
                {
                    students[studentIndex].Std_no = parseStdNo(line);
                    break;
                }
                case 1:
                {
                    students[studentIndex].Std_name = parseStdName(line);
                    break;
                }
                case 2:
                {
                    students[studentIndex].Std_gender = parseStdGender(line);
                    break;
                }
            }

            lineType++;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i <= studentIndex; i++) {
            printf("student\n\tnumber %i\n\tname: %s\n\tgender: %s\n", students[i].Std_no, students[i].Std_name, students[i].Std_gender);
        }
    }
    else {
        printf("could not read from file\n");
    }

    getchar();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
From the homework tag: "Don't ask for 'complete' solutions to the problem; we're not here to do your homework for you.". – Oliver Charlesworth Feb 28 '12 at 0:03
    
@OliCharlesworth I started my answer before the tag was added – Richard J. Ross III Feb 28 '12 at 0:24

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