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I'm building a large C++ program with a variety of different compile-time options, selected by #defines (or the -D option).

I want to have a version string that lists a number of them as tags, and ideally, to have that version string defined as a literal, not a constant.

Currently, I'm looking at two options, neither of which is ideal.

1) Piles of preprocessor defines

#ifdef AAA
#define AAAMSG " [A]"
#else
#define AAAMSG ""
#endif
#ifdef BBB
#define BBBMSG " [B]"
#else
#define BBBMSG ""
#endif
// ...
#define REVISION __DATE__ " " __TIME__ AAAMSG BBBMSG CCCMSG DDDMSG

2) Build a constant

const char *const REVISION=__DATE__ " " __TIME__
#ifdef AAA
" [A]"
#endif
#ifdef BBB
" [B]"
#endif
// ...
;

3) Redefine the token

#define REVISION __DATE__ " " __TIME__
#ifdef AAA
#define REVISION REVISION " [A]"
#endif
#ifdef BBB
#define REVISION REVISION " [B]"
#endif
// ...

The first one is incredibly verbose (imagine that with half a dozen independent elements) and error-prone. The second one is far better, but it creates a constant instead of a literal, so I can't use it as part of another string - example:

send(sock,"rev " REVISION "\n",sizeof(REVISION)+4,0);

It seems silly to use run-time string manipulation (an sprintf or somesuch) for a compile-time constant. The third example, of course, just straight-up doesn't work, but it is pretty much what I'm trying to do.

Is there some alternative method?

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Should it not be sizeof(REVISION)+5? –  Joe McGrath Feb 28 '12 at 2:22
    
You may be interested in constexp compile time string processing –  Joe McGrath Feb 28 '12 at 2:30
    
@JoeMcGrath - no, because the sizeof includes the \0 at the end, which I don't transmit. –  rosuav Feb 28 '12 at 6:17

2 Answers 2

#define AAAMSG ""
#define BBBMSG ""

#ifdef AAA
    #define AAAMSG " [A]"
#endif

define all your empties.. then treat it like a switch. If you keep the types the same, you shouldn't have any issues with redefining..

Note: I am not 100% sure this works, but changing a define can be done.

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Changing a define requires undeffing it first (gcc specially permits you to redefine something as what it already is, but this is a substantive change), so this isn't any less clunky. I did consider the possibility, but it's not materially different from my original option 1, and it separates pieces of one option's code. –  rosuav Feb 28 '12 at 6:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Closing off this question with the comment that I'm sticking with option 1. There appears to be no way to do what I was hoping to do, so the imperfect remains. Thanks to those who contributed!

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