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I have this function sentanceParse with a string input which returns a list. The input might be something like "Hello my name is Anton. What's your name?" and then the return value would be a list containing "Hello my name is Anton" and "What's your name?". However, this is not what happens. It seems as if the whitespaces in the sentences are treated like a separator and therefore the return is rather "Hello", "my", "name" etc instead of what I expected.

How would you propose I solve this?

As I am not a 100% sure the problem does not lie within my code, I will add that to the post as well:

Main:

list<string> mylist = sentanceParse(textCipher);
list<string>::iterator it;
for(it = mylist.begin(); it != mylist.end(); it++){
    textCipher = *it;
    cout << textCipher << endl; //This prints out the words separately instead of the entire sentances.

sentanceParse:

list<string> sentanceParse(string strParse){
    list<string> strList;
    int len = strParse.length();
    int pos = 0;
    int count = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < len; i++){
        if(strParse.at(i) == '.' || strParse.at(i) == '!' || strParse.at(i) == '?'){
            if(i < strParse.length() - 1){
                while(i < strParse.length() - 1 && (strParse.at(i+1) == '.' || strParse.at(i+1) == '!' || strParse.at(i+1) == '?')){
                    if(strParse.at(i+1) == '?'){
                        strParse.replace(i, 1, "?");
                    }
                    strParse.erase(i+1, 1);
                    len -= 1;
                }
            }
            char strTemp[2000];
            int lenTemp = strParse.copy(strTemp, i - pos + 1, pos);
            strTemp[lenTemp] = '\0';
            std::string strAdd(strTemp);
            strList.push_back(strAdd);
            pos = i + 1;
            count ++;
        }
    }

    if(count == 0){
        strList.push_back(strParse);
    }

    return strList;
}
share|improve this question
    
Any reason you're not using Boost here? There's boost::tokenizer for example, which will do your job perfectly fine (though the documentation is a little bit.. Spartan). –  Xeo Feb 28 '12 at 1:39
    
Never heard of it before actually, I'll check it out. –  Anton Feb 28 '12 at 1:40
    
Basically, it will look something like tokenizer<char_seperator<char>> toks(strParse, char_seperator<char>(".!?")); for(auto& tok : toks){ /* process each sentence... */ } –  Xeo Feb 28 '12 at 1:44
1  
@Xeo Using boost for something so simple would be a bit overkill. –  Skyler Saleh Feb 28 '12 at 1:57
1  
@Xeo A good C++ programmer would be able to write a lexer this simple faster than you could read the documentation for boost tokenizer. Also boost brings a huge dependency into your program with a complicated build system. On top of that it proliferates everywhere and contrary to popular belief, is not that modular. I have never successfully used only a single module of boost as they all tend to include each other. Now don't get me wrong, Boost is one of the best libraries ever written. However the use of a >100MB library to save 5 lines of code is the definition of overkill. –  Skyler Saleh Feb 28 '12 at 18:41
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your implementation of sentence parse is wrong, here is a simpler correct solution.

std::list<std::string> sentence_parse(const std::string &str){
    std::string temp;
    std::list<std::string> t;

    for(int x=0; x<str.size();++x){
       if(str[x]=='.'||str[x]=='!'||str[x]=='?'){
           if(temp!="")t.push_back(temp);//Handle special case of input with
                                         //multiple punctuation Ex. Hi!!!!
           temp="";
       }else temp+=str[x];
    }
    return t;
}

EDIT:

Here is a full example program using this function. Type some sentences in your console, press enter and it will spit the sentences out with a newline separating them instead of punctuation.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <list>
std::list<std::string> sentence_parse(const std::string &str){
    std::string temp;
    std::list<std::string> t;

    for(int x=0; x<str.size();++x){
        if(str[x]=='.'||str[x]=='!'||str[x]=='?'){
            if(temp!="")t.push_back(temp);//Handle special case of input with
                                          //multiple punctuation Ex. Hi!!!!
            temp="";
        }else temp+=str[x];
    }
    return t;
}
int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    std::string s;

    while (std::getline(std::cin,s)) {       
        std::list<std::string> t= sentence_parse(s);
        std::list<std::string>::iterator x=t.begin();
        while (x!=t.end()) {
             std::cout<<*x<<"\n";
            ++x;
        }

    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
But say the input was "One two three!", would they not be divided as "One", "two" and "three" in the list? My problem is the whitespaces acting like separators. –  Anton Feb 28 '12 at 1:59
    
Try this code it will work and will not have the whitespace act as separators. –  Skyler Saleh Feb 28 '12 at 2:06
    
It does not work (tested it). It returns only the last words from each given sentance. When a sentance is added to the list, only the content after the last whitespace is included. –  Anton Feb 28 '12 at 2:17
    
I'll try your example. –  Anton Feb 28 '12 at 2:17
    
I just compiled this code on my own computer and tested it, and it works fine. –  Skyler Saleh Feb 28 '12 at 2:19
show 1 more comment
// This function should be easy to adapt to any basic libary
// this is in Windows MFC
// pass in a string, a char and a stringarray
// returns an array of strings using char as the separator

void tokenizeString(CString theString, TCHAR theToken, CStringArray *theParameters)
{
    CString temp = "";
    int i = 0;

    for(i = 0; i < theString.GetLength(); i++ ) 
    {                                   
        if (theString.GetAt(i) != theToken) 
        {
            temp += theString.GetAt(i); 
        }
        else
        {
            theParameters->Add(temp);   
            temp = "";
        }
        if(i == theString.GetLength()-1)
            theParameters->Add(temp);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would work if the input wasn't user generated. Let's say the input is "Hi!!! I am Anton. What's your name!?". In this case, I would like the return to be "Hi!", "I am Anton.", "What's your name?". I'll probably think about working with an array the way you do here instead of a list though. –  Anton Feb 28 '12 at 1:48
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