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def func(a, b = 100):
  return a + b

func(a)
func(a,b = 100)

Is there any way to tell when func is called, b value 100 is taken from the default or keyword parameter?

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A lot of the answers look eerily familiar to a certain article I've read somewhere...This is probably a Good Thing. –  Droogans Feb 28 '12 at 1:42
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, not as you've written your code. However, you can do:

def func(a, b=None):
    if b is None:
        b = 100
    return a + b
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2  
How do yo kow if None was passed or not? –  Irfy Feb 28 '12 at 1:36
1  
Passing None is the same as not passing anything. –  wim Feb 28 '12 at 1:38
1  
No, you cannot differentiate the two cases is the correct way to describe what happens. I'm saying that, if you need to differentiate that, your solution doesn't work. –  Irfy Feb 28 '12 at 1:40
    
calling func(a_var) is equivalent to calling func(a_var, None). –  Droogans Feb 28 '12 at 1:44
2  
If you really need to know, then you need to make the default something that can't possibly be passed in, by packaging up the function in such a way that the caller doesn't have access to the default value. –  Karl Knechtel Feb 28 '12 at 1:54
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An anonymous object is the way to go to cover all possible cases.

def foo(a, b=object()):
    if b is foo.func_defaults[0]:
         # no value was passed
    # do whatever
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+1 this seems like the best approach. –  Daniel Feb 28 '12 at 1:55
    
+1 interesting! –  wim Feb 28 '12 at 2:20
    
Clever, but if I saw this in real code it would most definitely make me scratch my head. –  Adam Parkin Feb 28 '12 at 5:18
    
@AdamParkin Yes, in 90% cases (or more), the None solution will be "better", just because it is easier to understand. If I was reviewing the code I posted in real world, I would demand either an approach with None or a justification for why this specific approach is necessary. But it's still the solve-it-all hammer approach, nonetheless and may have been the solution if the OP needed the solve-it-all hammer. –  Irfy Feb 28 '12 at 15:00
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It's not really func's business to know. But you can default to None instead.

def func(a, b=None):
  if b is None:
    # b = default b
    b = 100
  return a + b
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You can use an object as the default value, e.g.

dummy = object()

def func(a, b=dummy):
  used_default = b is dummy
  if used_default:
    b = 100
  print used_default

func(0)           # prints True
func(0, None)     # prints False
func(0, object()) # prints False
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Fine, use an immutable object. It doesn't matter since it's a dummy object that you wouldn't do anything with. –  Daniel Feb 28 '12 at 1:43
    
Oh, I see what you did there. You are testing if the id matches. The link I left you is more about passing in empty lists, to be used later in the function. –  Droogans Feb 28 '12 at 1:50
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If your intent is to check if b matches a default value exactly, then don't use a default value! If you absolutely have to leave b optional, pass a special value (perhaps -1) to denote an unusual case, and be sure to note this in your __doc__. Just make sure that you're not able to reach the exceptional value in any day-to-day use, and that the exceptions written to contain that logic do not modify sensitive areas of your code.

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An alternative to the other suggestions is to use a kwargs parameter and then do something like this:

def func(a, **kwargs):
if 'b' in kwargs:
    print 'b was passed in'
    b = kwargs['b']
else:
    print 'b was not passed in'
    b = 100

return a + b


a = 50
func(a)
func(a, b = 100)

Output:

b was not passed in
150
b was passed in
150

Because kwargs is a dictionary containing all non-optional parameters you can examine this dictionary to determine what was/wasn't passed.

You can make the lookup of b more efficient rather then looking up kwargs twice if needed.

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