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I have a table with transactions:

Transactions
------------
id | account | type | date_time             | amount
----------------------------------------------------
 1 | 001     | 'R'  | '2012-01-01 10:01:00' | 1000
 2 | 003     | 'R'  | '2012-01-02 12:53:10' | 1500
 3 | 003     | 'A'  | '2012-01-03 13:10:01' | -1500
 4 | 002     | 'R'  | '2012-01-03 17:56:00' | 2000
 5 | 001     | 'R'  | '2012-01-04 12:30:01' | 1000
 6 | 002     | 'A'  | '2012-01-04 13:23:01' | -2000
 7 | 003     | 'R'  | '2012-01-04 15:13:10' | 3000
 8 | 003     | 'R'  | '2012-01-05 12:12:00' | 1250
 9 | 003     | 'A'  | '2012-01-06 17:24:01' | -1250

and I wish to select all of certain type ('R'), but not those that immediatly (in order of the date_time field) have another transaction of another type ('A') for the same account filed...

So, the query should throw the following rows, given the previous example:

id | account |type  | date                  | amount
----------------------------------------------------
 1 | 001     | 'R'  | '2012-01-01 10:01:00' | 1000
 5 | 001     | 'R'  | '2012-01-04 12:30:01' | 1000
 7 | 003     | 'R'  | '2012-01-04 15:13:10' | 3000

(As you can see, row 2 isn't displayed because row 3 'cancels' it... also row 4 is 'cancelled' by row 6'; Row 7 do appears (even though the account 003 belongs to cancelled row #2, this time in row 7 it's not cancelled by any 'A' row); And row 8 won't appear (it's too for 003 account since now this one is cancelled by 9, which doesn't cancels 7 too, just the previouse one: 8...

I have tried Joins, subqueries in Where clauses but I'm really not sure how do I must make my query...

What I have tried:

Trying joins:

   SELECT trans.type as type,
          trans.amount as amount,
          trans.date_time as dt,
          trans.account as acct,
     FROM Transactions trans
INNER JOIN ( SELECT t.type AS type, t.acct AS acct, t.date_time AS date_time
               FROM Transactions t
              WHERE t.date_time > trans.date_time
           ORDER BY t.date_time DESC
          ) AS nextTrans
       ON nextTrans.acct = trans.acct
    WHERE trans.type IN ('R')
      AND nextTrans.type NOT IN ('A')
 ORDER BY DATE(trans.date_time) ASC

This throws an error, since I can't introduce external values to the JOIN in MySQL.

Trying subquery in where:

   SELECT trans.type as type,
          trans.amount as amount,
          trans.date_time as dt,
          trans.account as acct,
     FROM Transactions trans
    WHERE trans.type IN ('R')
      AND trans.datetime <
          ( SELECT t.date_time AS date_time
               FROM Transactions t
              WHERE t.account = trans.account
           ORDER BY t.date_time DESC
          ) AS nextTrans
       ON nextTrans.acct = trans.acct

 ORDER BY DATE(trans.date_time) ASC

This is wrong, I can get to introduce external values to the WHERE in MySQL but I cannot manage to find the way to filter correctly for what I need...

IMPORTANT EDIT:

I managed to achieve a solution, but it now needs serious optimization. Here it is:

SELECT *
  FROM (SELECT t1.*, tFlagged.id AS cancId, tFlagged.type AS cancFlag
          FROM transactions t1
     LEFT JOIN (SELECT t2.*
                  FROM transactions t2
              ORDER BY t2.date_time ASC ) tFlagged
            ON (t1.account=tFlagged.account
                  AND
                t1.date_time < tFlagged.date_time)
         WHERE t1.type = 'R'
      GROUP BY t1.id) tCanc
 WHERE tCanc.cancFlag IS NULL
    OR tCanc.cancFlag <> 'A'

I joined the table with itself, just considering same account and great date_time. The Join goes ordered by date_time. Grouping by id I managed to get only the first result of the join, which happens to be the next transaction for the same account.

Then on the outer select, I filter out those that have an 'A', since that means that the next transaction was effectively a cancelation for it. In other words, if there is no next transaction for the same account or if the next transaction is an 'R', then it is not cancelled and it must be shown in the result...

I got this:

+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+--------+----------+
| id | account | type | date_time           | amount | cancId | cancFlag |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+--------+----------+
|  1 | 001     |   R  | 2012-01-01 10:01:00 |   1000 |      5 | R        |
|  5 | 001     |   R  | 2012-01-04 12:30:01 |   1000 |   NULL | NULL     |
|  7 | 003     |   R  | 2012-01-04 15:13:10 |   3000 |      8 | R        |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+--------+----------+

It relates each transaction with the next one in time for the same account and then filters out those that have been cancelled... Success!!

As I said, the problem now is optimization. My real data has a lot of rows (as a table holding transactions through time is expected to have), and for a table of ~10,000 rows right now, I got a positive result with this query in 1min.44sec. I suppose that's the thing with joins... (For those who know the protocol in here, what should I do? launch a new question here and post this as a solution to this one? Or just wait for more answers here?)

share|improve this question
    
Post what you have tried. –  OMG Ponies Feb 28 '12 at 1:42
    
there it is ... –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 1:57
    
    
thanks for the feedback... :P –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 3:32
    
is the id column always ordered by time? if so you can do a join on id=id+1. –  andrew cooke Feb 28 '12 at 3:58
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is a solution based on nested subqueries. First, I added a few rows to catch a few more cases. Transaction 10, for example, should not be cancelled by transaction 12, because transaction 11 comes in between.

> select * from transactions order by date_time;
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
| id | account | type | date_time           | amount |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
|  1 |       1 | R    | 2012-01-01 10:01:00 |   1000 |
|  2 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-02 12:53:10 |   1500 |
|  3 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-03 13:10:01 |  -1500 |
|  4 |       2 | R    | 2012-01-03 17:56:00 |   2000 |
|  5 |       1 | R    | 2012-01-04 12:30:01 |   1000 |
|  6 |       2 | A    | 2012-01-04 13:23:01 |  -2000 |
|  7 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-04 15:13:10 |   3000 |
|  8 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-05 12:12:00 |   1250 |
|  9 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-06 17:24:01 |  -1250 |
| 10 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-07 00:00:00 |   1250 |
| 11 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-07 05:00:00 |   4000 |
| 12 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-08 00:00:00 |  -1250 |
| 14 |       2 | R    | 2012-01-09 00:00:00 |   2000 |
| 13 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-10 00:00:00 |  -1500 |
| 15 |       2 | A    | 2012-01-11 04:00:00 |  -2000 |
| 16 |       2 | R    | 2012-01-12 00:00:00 |   5000 |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
16 rows in set (0.00 sec)

First, create a query to grab, for each transaction, "the date of the most recent transaction before that one in the same account":

SELECT t2.*,
       MAX(t1.date_time) AS prev_date
FROM transactions t1
JOIN transactions t2
ON (t1.account = t2.account
   AND t2.date_time > t1.date_time)
GROUP BY t2.account,t2.date_time
ORDER BY t2.date_time;

+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+---------------------+
| id | account | type | date_time           | amount | prev_date           |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+---------------------+
|  3 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-03 13:10:01 |  -1500 | 2012-01-02 12:53:10 |
|  5 |       1 | R    | 2012-01-04 12:30:01 |   1000 | 2012-01-01 10:01:00 |
|  6 |       2 | A    | 2012-01-04 13:23:01 |  -2000 | 2012-01-03 17:56:00 |
|  7 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-04 15:13:10 |   3000 | 2012-01-03 13:10:01 |
|  8 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-05 12:12:00 |   1250 | 2012-01-04 15:13:10 |
|  9 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-06 17:24:01 |  -1250 | 2012-01-05 12:12:00 |
| 10 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-07 00:00:00 |   1250 | 2012-01-06 17:24:01 |
| 11 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-07 05:00:00 |   4000 | 2012-01-07 00:00:00 |
| 12 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-08 00:00:00 |  -1250 | 2012-01-07 05:00:00 |
| 14 |       2 | R    | 2012-01-09 00:00:00 |   2000 | 2012-01-04 13:23:01 |
| 13 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-10 00:00:00 |  -1500 | 2012-01-08 00:00:00 |
| 15 |       2 | A    | 2012-01-11 04:00:00 |  -2000 | 2012-01-09 00:00:00 |
| 16 |       2 | R    | 2012-01-12 00:00:00 |   5000 | 2012-01-11 04:00:00 |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+---------------------+
13 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Use that as a subquery to get each transaction and its predecessor on the same row. Use some filtering to pull out the transactions we're interested in - namely, 'A' transactions whose predecessors are 'R' transactions that they exactly cancel out -

SELECT
  t3.*,transactions.*
FROM
  transactions
  JOIN
  (SELECT t2.*,
          MAX(t1.date_time) AS prev_date
   FROM transactions t1
   JOIN transactions t2
   ON (t1.account = t2.account
      AND t2.date_time > t1.date_time)
   GROUP BY t2.account,t2.date_time) t3
  ON t3.account = transactions.account
     AND t3.prev_date = transactions.date_time
     AND t3.type='A'
     AND transactions.type='R'
     AND t3.amount + transactions.amount = 0
  ORDER BY t3.date_time;


+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+---------------------+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
| id | account | type | date_time           | amount | prev_date           | id | account | type | date_time           | amount |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+---------------------+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
|  3 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-03 13:10:01 |  -1500 | 2012-01-02 12:53:10 |  2 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-02 12:53:10 |   1500 |
|  6 |       2 | A    | 2012-01-04 13:23:01 |  -2000 | 2012-01-03 17:56:00 |  4 |       2 | R    | 2012-01-03 17:56:00 |   2000 |
|  9 |       3 | A    | 2012-01-06 17:24:01 |  -1250 | 2012-01-05 12:12:00 |  8 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-05 12:12:00 |   1250 |
| 15 |       2 | A    | 2012-01-11 04:00:00 |  -2000 | 2012-01-09 00:00:00 | 14 |       2 | R    | 2012-01-09 00:00:00 |   2000 |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+---------------------+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
4 rows in set (0.00 sec)

From the result above it's apparent we're almost there - we've identified the unwanted transactions. Using LEFT JOIN we can filter these out of the whole transaction set:

SELECT
  transactions.*
FROM
  transactions
LEFT JOIN
  (SELECT
     transactions.id
   FROM
     transactions
     JOIN
     (SELECT t2.*,
             MAX(t1.date_time) AS prev_date
      FROM transactions t1
      JOIN transactions t2
      ON (t1.account = t2.account
         AND t2.date_time > t1.date_time)
      GROUP BY t2.account,t2.date_time) t3
     ON t3.account = transactions.account
        AND t3.prev_date = transactions.date_time
        AND t3.type='A'
        AND transactions.type='R'
        AND t3.amount + transactions.amount = 0) t4
  USING(id)
  WHERE t4.id IS NULL
    AND transactions.type = 'R'
  ORDER BY transactions.date_time;

+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
| id | account | type | date_time           | amount |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
|  1 |       1 | R    | 2012-01-01 10:01:00 |   1000 |
|  5 |       1 | R    | 2012-01-04 12:30:01 |   1000 |
|  7 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-04 15:13:10 |   3000 |
| 10 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-07 00:00:00 |   1250 |
| 11 |       3 | R    | 2012-01-07 05:00:00 |   4000 |
| 16 |       2 | R    | 2012-01-12 00:00:00 |   5000 |
+----+---------+------+---------------------+--------+
share|improve this answer
    
yes almost there! but why does 11, if it is cancelled by 12, appears on the final result? –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 19:15
    
OK I misunderstood the question; I thought for an A to be a cancellation, its amount field had to be the negation of the amount in the R row. Getting rid of the AND t3.amount + transactions.amount = 0 clause should take away this constraint (and give what you're looking for) –  gcbenison Feb 28 '12 at 19:52
    
wait! you are more right than me! I didn't noticed that detail, that of course is what I'm looking for :) Let me do further tests! I think this is finally the right one :) –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 23:36
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here I have tried in MSSQL. Please check logic and try in mysql. I assume the logic is that make new transaction after first transaction cancel. In your illustration, id = 7 is made after id=3 canceled.

I have checked in mssql

create table Transactions(id int,account varchar(5),  tp char(1),date_time datetime,amount int)

insert into Transactions values (1,'001','R','2012-01-01 10:01:00',1000)
insert into Transactions values (2,'003','R','2012-01-02 12:53:10',1500)
insert into Transactions values (3,'003','A','2012-01-03 13:10:01',-1500)
insert into Transactions values (4,'002','R','2012-01-03 17:56:00',2000)
insert into Transactions values (5,'001','R','2012-01-04 12:30:01',1000)
insert into Transactions values (6,'002','A','2012-01-04 13:23:01',-2000)
insert into Transactions values (7,'003','R','2012-01-04 15:13:10',3000)


select t.id, t.account, t.date_time, t.amount
from Transactions t
where t.tp = 'R'
and not exists
(
    select account, date_time
    from Transactions
    where tp = 'A'
    and account = t.account
    and t.date_time < date_time
)
share|improve this answer
    
the logic you assumed is right, thanks for your time :) In fact if somewhere after row 7 there have been another 'R' row for account 003, then it also must be showed. But if after that one another 'A' row for account 003 is created, then the new row won't appear, but 7 still should appear. Let me edit my example to illustrate that. By what you know of the logic you used on this script, do you think it should behave like that? –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 2:57
1  
Ok, it is better you provide enough illustration data to meet all you want. Let try again. –  Thit Lwin Oo Feb 28 '12 at 3:04
    
You are right... Thinking about the problem, and as far as I can tell, this are then last the use cases I need to include... Testing with your script as is, row 7 is excluded, which it shouldn't, so further changes are needed :) Let's think about it... –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 3:23
    
I edited the original post, with a solution I found myself, but needs further work, just in case you wish to look at it... –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 7:09
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(edited 2 ) TRY THIS:

 SELECT trans.tp as type,
trans.id as id,
 trans.amount as amount, 
trans.date_time as dt, 
trans.account as acct
FROM Transactions trans
WHERE trans.tp = 'R' 
AND trans.account NOT IN (SELECT t.account AS acct
   FROM Transactions t
 WHERE t.date_time > trans.date_time
 AND t.tp = 'A'
AND t.amount = (trans.amount)-((trans.amount)*2)
  ORDER BY t.date_time DESC
 )  ;
share|improve this answer
    
mmmm perhaps... just a doubt... why <= in the date_time where clause? the 'A' rows are supposed to exist AFTER some 'R' row, so for any 'R' that is supposed to be cancelled, then there may be an 'A' row but its date will be on the future of the 'R' row, not in its past... –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 2:38
    
If you remove it from the where clause, will it give you the correct output? –  prukuhkoo Feb 28 '12 at 2:43
    
i just need to test it, I have a lot of data so tests aren't easy. I asked just to see the assumptions at the bottom of the query (which I just don't see right now, perhaps I need a rest ;) , and then to see if I can test it further or just discard it if they are the wrong ones.. –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 2:51
    
ok, I tested just with the data I used in my example, but it doesn't shows row 7, please see the comments on the previous answer, I added rows 8 and 9 to exemplify another use case :) Thanks for your time too! (BTW, the <= is wrong, it should be >, with the tests now I can say that :) –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 3:20
1  
i edited it again.. am i doing it right? –  prukuhkoo Feb 28 '12 at 6:07
show 7 more comments

If ID really does correspond to the index of the rows when sorted on date_time - as it does in the example (and if it didn't, you could create such an ID field) - you can do this:

SELECT t1.*
FROM transactions t1 JOIN transactions t2 ON(t2.id = t1.id + 1)
WHERE t1.type = 'R'
  AND NOT((t2.type = 'A') AND ((t1.amount + t2.amount) = 0))

i.e. use the ID field to get each row and its successor in the same result row; then filter for the properties you want.

share|improve this answer
    
I've tried this but it doesn't works. Even with the data I use as an example (and it's just that, I tried to simplify a lot my model so that only the essence of the problem is shown here), this script shows me rows with ids 1,4,5,7 but from the beginning, row 4 shouldn't show up. As you can see, row 4 is 'cancelled' at row 6, not immediatly at row 5, so incrementing id by 1 is not working for this particular case... Any way, the fact that id's show as if indexing by date is just an artifact of my example... –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 5:49
1  
@javier OK I see that now - scratch this approach and see my newer answer –  gcbenison Feb 28 '12 at 17:07
add comment

To improve your query try this:

SELECT t1.*, tFlagged.id AS cancId, tFlagged.tp AS cancFlag FROM t t1
LEFT JOIN t tFlagged
ON t1.account = tFlagged.account AND t1.date_time < tFlagged.date_time
WHERE t1.tp = 'R' 
GROUP BY t1.id
HAVING tFlagged.tp is null or tFlagged.tp <> 'A'

It'll run much faster... hopefully providing the same results :P

share|improve this answer
    
the query for the solution doesn't even has that condition... and the correct one with a similar conditions needs that to filter correctly the data in the join... –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 7:21
1  
good point :) I copied from anywhere –  Mosty Mostacho Feb 28 '12 at 7:23
1  
ok... let me test it deeply with my real data. The query is really fast compared to what I have, but gives me different number of result rows, so I have to analize it first... Thanks! –  Javier Novoa C. Feb 28 '12 at 7:31
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