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I have to split a string into a list because i dont know how many values the list is going to have. How would I do this without knowing how many are going to be in the List?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming your string is comma delimited:

var str = "this, is, a, list, of, stuff";
var list = 
      str
        .Split(',')
        //.Select(s => s.Trim()) //maybe a good idea?
        .ToList();
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what does .Select do? –  Oztaco Feb 28 '12 at 2:07
1  
Ah.There's a question... string.Split returns an array (or IEnumerable<string>) which means you can use linq extension methods on it. blogs.msdn.com/b/charlie/archive/2006/10/29/… –  spender Feb 28 '12 at 2:17
    
im sure if i stare at it for another 5 mins ill understand it hahaha, just kdding –  Oztaco Feb 28 '12 at 2:52

String.Split[] returns string[]. The array will hold however many elements the string had. Can't you use that? See http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/b873y76a.aspx

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I have to split a string into a list because i dont know how many values the list is going to have.

I am not sure why you think you need a list to know how many values are returned by Split?

The call to Split does tell you how many values it finds.

For Example:

using System;

namespace SampleApplication
{
    static class Program
    {
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            var input = "one,two,three,four,five,six";

            string [] words = input.Split(',');

            Console.WriteLine("Number of Words: {0}", words.Length);

            foreach (object value in words)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(value.ToString());
            }
        }
    }
}

This code produces this output:

C:\temp>test
Number of Words: 6
one
two
three
four
five
six

C:\temp>
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it was a typo, i meant but i dont know not because I dont know, but thanks now i know something else i didnt :) –  Oztaco Feb 29 '12 at 1:07

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