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I have many text files of fixed-width data, e.g.:

$ head model-q-060.txt 
% x                      y                        
15.0                     0.0                      
15.026087                -1.0                     
15.052174                -2.0                     
15.07826                 -3.0                     
15.104348                -4.0                     
15.130435                -5.0                     
15.156522                -6.0                     
15.182609                -6.9999995               
15.208695                -8.0  

The data comprise 3 or 4 runs of a simulation, all stored in the one text file, with no separator between runs. In other words, there is no empty line or anything, e.g. if there were only 3 'records' per run it would look like this for 3 runs:

$ head model-q-060.txt 
% x                      y                        
15.0                     0.0                      
15.026087                -1.0                     
15.052174                -2.0                     
15.0                     0.0                      
15.038486                -1.0                     
15.066712                -2.0                     
15.0                     0.0                      
15.041089                -1.0                     
15.087612                -2.0                     

It's a COMSOL Multiphysics output file for those interested. Visually you can tell where the new run data begin, as the first x-value is repeated (actually the entire second line might be the same for all of them). So I need to firstly open the file and get this x-value, save it, then use it as a pattern to match with awk or csplit. I am struggling to work this out!

csplit will do the job:

$ csplit -z -f 'temp' -b '%02d.txt' model-q-060.txt /^15\.0\\s/ {*}

but I have to know the pattern to split on. This question is similar but each of my text files might have a different pattern to match: Split files based on file content and pattern matching.

Ben.

share|improve this question
    
Would you object to a python or perl-based solution? It'd only be a few lines, I expect. –  DSM Feb 28 '12 at 3:39
    
Following this I'm processing the data in python-matplotlib, so python would be great too! –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 4:05
    
Is a start of the new run the only time that the independent variable can go backwards? That seems to be to be a much more robust detection method than looking for a repeated line. –  Ben Voigt Feb 28 '12 at 4:11
    
Ben Voigt - yes, good observation. How do you mean to then use that? –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 4:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a simple awk script that will do what you want:

BEGIN { fn=0 }
NR==1 { next }
NR==2 { delim=$1 }
$1 == delim {
    f=sprintf("test%02d.txt",fn++);
    print "Creating " f
}

{ print $0 > f }
  1. initialize output file number
  2. ignore the first line
  3. extract the delimiter from the second line
  4. for every input line whose first token matches the delimiter, set up the output file name
  5. for all lines, write to the current output file
share|improve this answer
    
This is most elegant, and pretty clean code to read, thanks! Sorry I can't split the points with you and @icyrock.com. –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 5:26
    
+1 for explanations, even though I might take a while to figure it out. –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 5:34
    
In the third line above, does $1 capture the entire line into delim? –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 5:44
    
No, just the first token –  Jim Garrison Feb 28 '12 at 20:25
    
thanks Jim, made some small changes to add a header to the file, and reverse the order of field output, and convert to comma-separated. Very cool. –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 23:55

This should do the job - test somewhere you don't have a lot of temp*.txt files: :)

rm -f temp*.txt

cat > f1.txt <<EOF
% x                      y                        
15.0                     0.0                      
15.026087                -1.0                     
15.052174                -2.0                     
15.0                     0.0                      
15.038486                -1.0                     
15.066712                -2.0                     
15.0                     0.0                      
15.041089                -1.0                     
15.087612                -2.0    
EOF

first=`awk 'NR==2{print $1}' f1.txt|sed 's/\\./\\\\./'`
echo --- Splitting by: $first

csplit -z -f temp -b %02d.txt f1.txt /^"$first"\\s/ {*}

for i in temp*.txt; do
  echo ---- $i
  cat $i
done

The output of the above is:

--- Splitting by: 15\.0
51
153
153
136
---- temp00.txt
% x                      y                        
---- temp01.txt
15.0                     0.0                      
15.026087                -1.0                     
15.052174                -2.0                     
---- temp02.txt
15.0                     0.0                      
15.038486                -1.0                     
15.066712                -2.0                     
---- temp03.txt
15.0                     0.0                      
15.041089                -1.0                     
15.087612                -2.0    

Of course, you will run into trouble if you have repeating second column value (15.0 in the above example) - solving that would be a tad harder - exercise left for the reader...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, good work. The 15.0 value won't repeat until the new run begins, however 15.000000 might appear. –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 4:07
    
Thanks. 15.000000 will be filtered by \\s that you already had, so you should be good there. The only thing left is to try it out... :) –  icyrock.com Feb 28 '12 at 4:12
    
First time I've used awk, bit of learning to do, but this seems a good way, even if some of it is eye-watering. I've tried it out and it works fine. –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 5:21

If the amount of lines per run is constant, you could use this:

cat your_file.txt | grep -P "^\d" | \
   split --lines=$(expr \( $(wc -l "your_file.txt" | \
   awk '{print $1'}) - 1 \) / number_of_runs)
share|improve this answer
1  
Excellent lateral thinking, and it should work, as within each simulation each run will have the same number of 'records'. But, I'd have to check because sometimes I make them with 3 runs, and sometimes with 4, or more or less. –  a different ben Feb 28 '12 at 4:10
    
of course, then you would change the "number_of_runs" variable in the code to match –  blacklemon67 Feb 28 '12 at 12:01

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